The Ringer's 2020 NFL
Draft Guide

With scouting reports by Danny Kelly

Updated 3.25
No Credits

Welcome to The Ringer’s 2020 NFL Draft Guide. Consider this your one-stop shop for all things draft-related leading up to the first round on April 23. It includes Danny Kelly’s Big Board rankings, scouting reports, mock drafts, and much more—and we’re updating it regularly to account for the latest news and developments. This has all the prospect analysis you need, whether you’re a fan or an executive determining the future of one of the NFL’s 32 franchises.

With the draft less than a month away, we’ve expanded the Big Board to include 75 players and the mock to forecast two full rounds. And on the heels of a hectic free-agent period, we’ve unveiled Robert Mays’s team needs section, which breaks down the biggest weaknesses on each roster that could be addressed in a few weeks. Could the Patriots target their next franchise quarterback? Will the Texans take a receiver to replace DeAndre Hopkins? Which team could trade up for Tua Tagovailoa?

Make sure to click through to check out the guide’s full suite of offerings, from our sort-by-position tool to our in-depth player cards. As people rise and fall, you’ll be able to keep track of the chaos.

Draft season is upon us. The fun starts now.

   
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Big Board by Danny Kelly Updated 3.25
Mock Draft Updated 3.25
Team Needs by Robert Mays Updated 3.25

You’re reading Danny Kelly’s Big Board, featuring his top NFL draft prospects. These rankings are Kelly’s personal top 75, and they incorporate factors such as physical traits, college production, and skills that seem translatable to the next level. The Big Board will be updated to reflect all the twists and turns of the draft process.

See the Mock Draft instead

You’re reading Danny Kelly’s mock draft, a breakdown of how he thinks the 2020 first and second rounds will unfold. The mock incorporates factors such as team needs, front-office preferences, and comments made by relevant players and executives. This mock has been updated to account for the latest moves and signings made during NFL free agency.

See the Big Board by Danny Kelly instead
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Chase Young
Cincinnati Bengals

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 33 6/8''
  • Wingspan 80 5/8''
  • Hand Size 10''
1

Chase Young

Edge Rusher

Ohio State, junior

  • TKLS Tackles 46
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 21
  • Sacks Sacks 16.5
Height/Weight6'5'', 264
Age20
Shades OfJadeveon Clowney

Dominant edge rusher with a rare combination of explosiveness, power, technique, and versatility

Main Selling Point: Game-wrecking pass-rush talent
Scouting Report

Young is an explosive pass rusher with a thick, muscular lower half and long, powerful arms. He boasts the type of mass, length, and athleticism to make impact plays all across the line―or even as a stand-up defender capable of dropping back into coverage. Young is at his best going forward, though, where he can use his elite get-off and extraordinary explosiveness as the foundations of his rush: He uncoils upfield with drag-racer acceleration to quickly get a step on opposing linemen and put them on their heels. From there, Young alternates between bending around the corner, using a countermove back inside, or going straight through his opponent with bulldozer-like power. The Heisman finalist has a well-rounded repertoire of pass-rush moves, using the side scissors, double scissors, and inside side scissors rush techniques to swipe away opponents’ hands and keep them lunging. He’s rarely stalemated at any point in his rush. 

Over the past two seasons, Young has posted absolutely bonkers statistical numbers, racking up a combined 27 sacks, 35.5 tackles for a loss, eight pass deflections, and eight forced fumbles in 25 games. His 16.5 sacks in 2019 set the new single-season Buckeyes record.

Why He Could Rise

Young boasts size, explosiveness, elite numbers, and a well-developed arsenal of pass rush techniques.

Why He Could Fall

Teams may balk at the fact he didn’t record a sack in his last three games at Ohio State. Hey, we had to put something here.

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 33 6/8''
  • Wingspan 80 5/8''
  • Hand Size 10''
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Joe Burrow
Washington Redskins

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 30 7/8''
  • Wingspan 74''
  • Hand Size 9''
2

Joe Burrow

Quarterback

LSU, redshirt senior

  • YDS Yards 5671
  • YPA Yards Per Attempt 10.8
  • TDS Touchdowns 60
  • INTS Interceptions 6
  • RTG Passer Rating 202.0
Height/Weight6'3'', 221
Age23
Shades OfSlim Andrew Luck

Hyperefficient signal-caller with top-tier accuracy, ice in his veins even under pressure, and some out-of-structure playmaking moxie―but just one season of elite production

Main Selling Point: Pinpoint accuracy, unshakable poise
Scouting Report

Burrow’s meteoric rise from middling QB afterthought to bona fide star in the Tigers’ new-look spread offense has been the defining story of the college football season. With an aggressive, attacking style and top-tier accuracy, Burrow repeatedly carved up the best defenses in college football, winning the Heisman Trophy and leading LSU to a national championship while putting together perhaps the best single-season passing performance in college football history, connecting on 76.3 percent of his passes for 5,671 yards, 60 touchdowns, and just six picks.

Burrow has a slender frame and lacks elite arm strength, but he separates himself with incredible accuracy, unshakeable composure under pressure, and the athleticism to extend plays or pick up yards with his feet. The former Ohio State transfer has the natural ability to navigate the pocket and escape pressure; he keeps both hands on the ball to avoid fumbles and can strafe, spin, duck, dive, and dodge his way out of trouble while keeping his eyes downfield. He keeps his balance when throwing on the run, and has shown the ability to twist his torso to generate torque on cross-body throws. The LSU star brings a scintillating combination of aggressiveness, strong decision-making, and pinpoint ball placement; per Pro Football Focus, Burrow tallied 32 big-time throws (a college football best) but just nine turnover-worthy plays during the regular season, grading out tops among all quarterbacks both under pressure and on tight-window passes. The fearless demeanor he showed in the biggest moments in 2019 invites Tom Brady comparisons.

Why He Could Rise

Burrow is the complete package at quarterback, boasting elite accuracy, playmaking talent, and leadership skills. He’s a near-lock to go no. 1.

Why He Could Fall

He won’t fall, but there could be concern around his massive jump in production in 2019, which came in LSU’s new shotgun-spread, RPO-heavy offense. His slender frame and aggressive running style could make him an injury risk at the next level.

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 30 7/8''
  • Wingspan 74''
  • Hand Size 9''
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Tua Tagovailoa
Detroit Lions

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 30 4/8''
  • Wingspan 75 2/8''
  • Hand Size 10''
3

Tua Tagovailoa

Quarterback

Alabama, junior

  • YDS Yards 2840
  • YPA Yards Per Attempt 11.3
  • TDS Touchdowns 33
  • INTS Interceptions 3
  • RTG Passer Rating 206.9
Height/Weight6'0'', 217
Age21
Shades OfSouthpaw Drew Brees

Dynamic, playmaking lefty with a quick-fire release and consistently perfect ball placement. Durability is the biggest question mark.

Main Selling Point: Processing speed, accuracy
Scouting Report

Tagovailoa will be one of the draft’s biggest X factors. When healthy, the Crimson Tide signal-caller boasts the processing speed, pocket presence, accuracy, and overall playmaking set to be a star at the next level. But the devastating hip injury he suffered in November could be a deal breaker for some teams. His medical checks leading up to April’s draft will determine just how high he’ll go.

Based purely on talent, though, Tua is the total package. The 6-foot-1, 232-pound dynamo leaves Alabama with the most statistically impressive passing career in college football history, finishing with the highest passer-efficiency rating (199.4) and yards-per-attempt average (10.9) ever to go with 87 touchdowns and just 11 picks. His 12.7 percent touchdown percentage ranks first in Division I history… by more than 2 percentage points. He’s a quick decision-maker, reading coverages almost instantly while decisively attacking downfield. He pairs those critical mental attributes with a tight, compact throwing motion that helps him put the right amount of touch on his passes at all three levels. Tagovailoa has an expert feel for the pocket, stepping up or away from pressure while keeping a balanced base and his eyes downfield. The junior quarterback doesn’t have a rocket arm, but the ball jumps off his hands; he can hit deep outs with plenty of velocity and he throws a pretty deep ball. In the short and intermediate areas, he leads his receivers away from big hits or hits them perfectly in stride so they turn upfield and pick up extra yards. Tagovailoa can pick up yards with his legs too; he rushed for 340 yards and nine touchdowns in his career. As far as intangibles go, Tua showcased incredible poise, toughness, and leadership in his three seasons at Alabama.

Tagovailoa gets in trouble when he tries to do too much, and that’s led to some turnovers. He’s gotten tunnel vision while moving through his progressions on a few occasions and has tried to force a few ill-advised passes off his back foot and into double coverage. Tagovailoa is a bit undersized by traditional standards, and the durability question is a big one: In addition to the hip injury, Tua has suffered high ankle sprains in each of the past two seasons (his left in 2018, his right this season), both necessitating a TightRope procedure to correct the issue.

Why He Could Rise

Tagovailoa is a decisive, accurate, and dynamic playmaker with all the intangibles of a franchise player. He also made one of the greatest throws in college football history.

Why He Could Fall

Tua’s hip injury could take him completely off some team’s boards. There could also be some concerns that his numbers were inflated by Alabama’s elite surrounding talent.

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 30 4/8''
  • Wingspan 75 2/8''
  • Hand Size 10''
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Isaiah Simmons
New York Giants

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.39
  • Vertical Jump 39''
  • Broad Jump 132''
  • Arm Length 33 3/8''
  • Wingspan 81 7/8''
  • Hand Size 9 5/8''
4

Isaiah Simmons

Linebacker

Clemson, redshirt junior

  • TKLS Tackles 102
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 16
  • Sacks Sacks 8
Height/Weight6'4'', 238
Age21
Shades OfMega Derwin James

The archetype of a modern positionless defender; a monumentally versatile athlete with size, length, physicality, and coverage chops to play anywhere in the back seven

Main Selling Point: Infinite versatility
Scouting Report

Simmons is listed as a linebacker here, but really he’s just a damn good football player, regularly shifting between linebacker, safety, edge rusher, nickelback, and cornerback alignments. At 6-foot-3 and 228 pounds with incredibly long arms, Simmons is a uniquely built and extraordinary athlete―he’s a former state champion long jumper with explosive hops, turbo acceleration, and high-end speed―allowing him to range sideline to sideline, blitz, or cover in the back end with equal aplomb. The Tigers star is a ferocious tackler who enthusiastically fills gaps seeking contact. He’s instinctive; he trusts his eyes and always seems to know where the ball is going. He can flip his hips and run with receivers, and knows how to turn back and look for the ball in coverage. He’s one of the few defenders who made the 2019 LSU offense sweat. 

The junior playmaker filled up just about every category on the stat sheet this year, racking up 104 tackles―16.5 going for a loss―with 8.0 sacks, three picks, eight pass deflections, and two forced fumbles. He has All-Pro potential early in his career.

Why He Could Rise

Simmons is an instinctive and uber-athletic plug-and-play starter who can come up into the box, play the slot, or patrol deep; the sky's the limit for how a creative coordinator could deploy him.

Why He Could Fall

Some teams may see him as a tweener without a position.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.39
  • Vertical Jump 39''
  • Broad Jump 132''
  • Arm Length 33 3/8''
  • Wingspan 81 7/8''
  • Hand Size 9 5/8''
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Jeff Okudah
Miami Dolphins

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.48
  • Vertical Jump 41''
  • Broad Jump 135''
  • Bench Press Reps 11
  • Arm Length 32 5/8''
  • Wingspan 78 5/8''
  • Hand Size 9 1/8''
5

Jeff Okudah

Cornerback

Ohio State, junior

  • TKLS Tackles 35
  • INTS Interceptions 3
  • PBU Pass Breakups 9
Height/Weight6'1'', 205
Age20
Shades OfMarshon Lattimore

Shutdown cornerback with prototypical size, electric feet, top-tier speed, and innate instincts; should be a day-one starter

Main Selling Point: Total-package skill set
Scouting Report

Okudah is an extraordinarily explosive athlete with quick feet, terrific speed, and jump-out-of-the-gym hops. The former five-star recruit and first-team All-American has excellent size and plays aggressively in press coverage, showing exceptional makeup speed to recover if he takes false steps or misses on his jam. He’s sticky in man-to-man looks. He’s patient, balanced, and methodical in bail or half-turn coverage, getting low into his stance to dissect the scheme and then flipping his hips to run with opposing receivers with ease. And he’s shown the ability to reel in interceptions while lying flat on his back. He’s a big-time playmaker ... even if he doesn’t always get the call when he forces a critical fumble.

Okudah notched three picks and broke up another nine passes this season, quieting concerns about a lack of ball-hawking skills. (He had zero interceptions playing a rotational role in his first two seasons.) Still, he needs to continue to improve at getting his head around to find the ball at the catch point. He may need to play stronger in the pros, because while he delivers some pop in run support, his tenacity in that area fluctuates.

Why He Could Rise

Okudah is a top-flight man-cover corner with the awareness and athleticism to play in multiple schemes and techniques. He has the talent to become one of the league’s next great shutdown corners.

Why He Could Fall

He started only one full season and is still inconsistent at the catch point.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.48
  • Vertical Jump 41''
  • Broad Jump 135''
  • Bench Press Reps 11
  • Arm Length 32 5/8''
  • Wingspan 78 5/8''
  • Hand Size 9 1/8''
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Tristan Wirfs
Los Angeles Chargers

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.85
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.65
  • Shuttle Time 4.68
  • Vertical Jump 36.5''
  • Broad Jump 121''
  • Bench Press Reps 24
  • Arm Length 34''
  • Wingspan 80 2/8''
  • Hand Size 10 2/8''
6

Tristan Wirfs

Tackle

Iowa, junior

  • GMS Games Played 13
  • STRTS Starts 13
  • Sk ALL Sacks Allowed 2
Height/Weight6'5'', 320
Age20
Shades OfTrent Williams

Agile blocker with massive size, smooth athleticism, and immense strength; mirrors in pass protection and moves people in the ground game

Main Selling Point: Outstanding power and athleticism
Scouting Report

Wirfs is a mountain of a man: He has tree trunks for legs, a beer keg for a torso, and pythons for arms. The Hawkeyes right tackle―a state champion high school wrestler and discus thrower (of course!) who set an Iowa record by power-cleaning 450 pounds―created plenty of movement in the team’s pro-style run game and showed surprising movement skills as a pass protector, too. He glides into his pass set with light feet and a balanced base. Wirfs has incredible upper-body strength to latch on to and control opponents; he also possesses good recovery skills, as he’s able to quickly gather his feet and re-anchor even when he’s knocked back at the snap. He allowed just 40 quarterback pressures on 1,138 career pass-block snaps, per Pro Football Focus

There are times when Wirfs can miss with his punch in the run game or get caught lunging forward in pass protection, though. In those cases, he’ll drop his head and shoulders and allow defenders to swim past him. He’s also inconsistent targeting blocks at the second level, but has the athletic traits to improve in that area.

Why He Could Rise

Wirfs is big, physical, and extremely athletic; he plays with light feet and strong hands in pass protection and incredible power in the run game.

Why He Could Fall

He can get out over his skis at times and fall off of blocks. And while he’s generally projected as a left tackle after playing on the right side at Iowa, some teams may view him as a future guard.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.85
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.65
  • Shuttle Time 4.68
  • Vertical Jump 36.5''
  • Broad Jump 121''
  • Bench Press Reps 24
  • Arm Length 34''
  • Wingspan 80 2/8''
  • Hand Size 10 2/8''
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Jedrick Wills Jr.
Carolina Panthers

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.05
  • Shuttle Time 4.84
  • Vertical Jump 34.5''
  • Broad Jump 113''
  • Arm Length 34 2/8''
  • Wingspan 83 4/8''
  • Hand Size 10''
7

Jedrick Wills Jr.

Tackle

Alabama, junior

  • GMS Games Played 13
  • STRTS Starts 13
  • Sk ALL Sacks Allowed 1
Height/Weight6'4'', 312
Age20
Shades OfLa’el Collins

Tough, physical right tackle with easy athleticism and bulldozer power

Main Selling Point: Glass-eater mentality
Scouting Report

Wills is an industrial-strength, physical mauler at right tackle who brings a tenacious demeanor to both the run and pass games. The former five-star recruit wastes few movements, calmly stunning opposing pass rushers with a strong punch or manhandling opponents with his superior upper-body torque. He stays balanced and never panics as a pass protector. And in the run game, he hits like a freight train on down blocks―at times sending his targets flailing―and finds and engages blocks well at the second level. Wills earned an elite run-blocking grade from Pro Football Focus; per the Alabama team website, he gave up just one sack and 3.5 quarterback hurries on 714 snaps in 2019. 

Wills played exclusively at right tackle in college. He certainly has the traits to play on the left side in the pros, but he’s also not experienced at that spot.

Why He Could Rise

Wills combines power, athleticism, and a nasty temperament; he should start from day one in the pros.

Why He Could Fall

He may lack the overall foot quickness to play on the blind side.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.05
  • Shuttle Time 4.84
  • Vertical Jump 34.5''
  • Broad Jump 113''
  • Arm Length 34 2/8''
  • Wingspan 83 4/8''
  • Hand Size 10''
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CeeDee Lamb
Arizona Cardinals

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.5
  • Vertical Jump 34.5''
  • Broad Jump 124''
  • Bench Press Reps 11
  • Arm Length 32 2/8''
  • Wingspan 76 5/8''
  • Hand Size 9 2/8''
8

CeeDee Lamb

Wide Receiver

Oklahoma, junior

  • YDS Yards 1327
  • YPR Yards Per Reception 21.4
  • TDS Touchdowns 14
  • REC Receptions 62
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 27
Height/Weight6'2'', 198
Age20
Shades OfSlim DeAndre Hopkins

Silky-smooth route-runner who’s savvy at the catch point and rugged and slippery after the catch, the definition of a playmaker

Main Selling Point: Big-play prowess, elusiveness
Scouting Report

Lamb is a dynamic and versatile pass-catcher with sinewy strength that belies his slender frame. The Biletnikoff finalist uses his quickness and turbo acceleration to get off the line of scrimmage and glide into his route stem before cutting sharply to create separation. On deeper routes, he lacks elite speed but is still dangerous thanks to his mastery at both tracking the ball in flight and dominating at the catch point. Using subtle tugs and push-offs to establish position get defenders off-balance, Lamb uses his length, strong hands, and unflinching focus to turn 50-50 balls into much higher-probability propositions. 

The first-team AP All-American caught 62 passes for 1,327 yards and 14 touchdowns (fifth most nationwide) in 2019 and totaled 173 receptions for 3,292 yards and 33 total touchdowns in three seasons in Norman. He averaged an absurd 19.0 yards per catch in his college career, including a 21.4-yard average in 2019—good for third among FBS players. Lamb is a big play waiting to happen, capable of taking the top off a defense or taking a quick slant or screen and turning it into a jail-break score. He’s extremely dangerous after the catch, using deft footwork to slalom through the defense; just ask Texas about that. There are moments in which he almost looks like a taller, lankier version of Alvin Kamara in the way he deflects contact, slips through tackle attempts, and explodes into the open field.

Why He Could Rise

Lamb has length, quickness, strong hands, and incredible run-after-the-catch talent; he’s a field-tilting presence who’s a threat to score on every play.

Why He Could Fall

He doesn’t always show a sense of urgency when the ball goes away from him, he has a slender frame, and he may lack the extra gear necessary to run away from NFL defenders.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.5
  • Vertical Jump 34.5''
  • Broad Jump 124''
  • Bench Press Reps 11
  • Arm Length 32 2/8''
  • Wingspan 76 5/8''
  • Hand Size 9 2/8''
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Andrew Thomas
Jacksonville Jaguars

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.22
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.58
  • Shuttle Time 4.66
  • Vertical Jump 30.5''
  • Broad Jump 109''
  • Bench Press Reps 21
  • Arm Length 36 1/8''
  • Wingspan 83 4/8''
  • Hand Size 10 2/8''
9

Andrew Thomas

Tackle

Georgia, junior

  • GMS Games Played 13
  • STRTS Starts 13
  • Sk ALL Sacks Allowed 1
Height/Weight6'5'', 315
Age20
Shades OfRussell Okung

Combines incredible size, strength, and flexibility as a blindside protector with road-grading power to open up lanes in the run game

Main Selling Point: Length and power
Scouting Report

Thomas boasts a massive, well-proportioned frame with very long arms. The Georgia team captain and Outland Trophy semifinalist plays with a balanced base, consistently keeping his knees bent and feet moving in pass protection, and has a smooth kickstep to gain depth at the snap. Thanks to his length and quickness, it takes edge rushers forever to run around him. Thomas brings versatility and experience on both sides of the line; he started 15 games at right tackle as a true freshman, then made the move to the left side, where he started 26 games in the past two seasons combined. He’s been incredibly consistent at both spots, allowing just 37 pressures in three years per PFF, with just nine pressures surrendered in 2019. He mirrors well, times his punch, and plays with heavy hands―but he can improve at sustaining his blocks. 

In the ground game, Thomas is a bulldozer. He creates movement at the point of attack, his quick footwork helps him reach and seal defenders on outside runs, and he engulfs defenders on second-level blocks. Thomas is prone to lunging as a run blocker, though, at times getting out over his skis and ending up on the ground.

Why He Could Rise

Thomas has a rare blend of size, athleticism, consistency, and versatility; he is a plug-and-play starter on either side of the line.

Why He Could Fall

He lacks balance at times and can fall off blocks when he relies too much on his upper body strength.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.22
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.58
  • Shuttle Time 4.66
  • Vertical Jump 30.5''
  • Broad Jump 109''
  • Bench Press Reps 21
  • Arm Length 36 1/8''
  • Wingspan 83 4/8''
  • Hand Size 10 2/8''
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Jerry Jeudy
Cleveland Browns

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.45
  • Shuttle Time 4.53
  • Vertical Jump 35''
  • Broad Jump 120''
  • Arm Length 32 1/8''
  • Wingspan 76''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
10

Jerry Jeudy

Wide Receiver

Alabama, junior

  • YDS Yards 1163
  • YPR Yards Per Reception 15.1
  • TDS Touchdowns 10
  • REC Receptions 77
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 21
Height/Weight6'1'', 193
Age20
Shades OfCalvin Ridley, Robert Woods

Precision route-runner with extraordinary foot speed to pick up yards after the catch

Main Selling Point: Human-joystick jukes, rare quickness
Scouting Report

Jeudy is a big-play creator with a long, slim frame and exceptional suddenness in all his movements. The Crimson Tide star is a crisp route runner who uses RC-car acceleration off the line to eat up cushion or force defenders to open their hips, creating early separation. The 6-foot-1, 195-pound playmaker is tough to corral after the catch, capable of changing direction on a dime and exploding past would-be tacklers with signature dead-leg-style cuts and rocker-step moves that leave defenders grasping at clouds of dust. 

Jeudy had a few too many drops at Alabama, but also showed the ability to make the tough grabs, going up high to pluck the ball from the air or bending to effortlessly scoop a low pass. The 20-year-old phenom (he’ll turn 21 in late April) followed up his Biletnikoff award-winning 68-catch, 1,315-yard, 14-touchdown performance in 2018 with 77 catches for 1,163 yards and 10 scores last season. He can line up all over the formation and is a threat both deep down the field and underneath.

Why He Could Rise

Jeudy is an electric, quick-twitch athlete who can separate as a route runner and make defenders miss after the catch.

Why He Could Fall

He had some drops in 2019. He also has a thin, wiry frame and could struggle against physical corners on the outside after playing primarily in the slot at Alabama.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.45
  • Shuttle Time 4.53
  • Vertical Jump 35''
  • Broad Jump 120''
  • Arm Length 32 1/8''
  • Wingspan 76''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
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Derrick Brown
New York Jets

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.16
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 8.22
  • Shuttle Time 4.79
  • Vertical Jump 27''
  • Broad Jump 108''
  • Bench Press Reps 28
  • Arm Length 34 2/8''
  • Wingspan 80 7/8''
  • Hand Size 9''
11

Derrick Brown

Interior Defensive Lineman

Auburn, senior

  • TKLS Tackles 55
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 12.5
  • Sacks Sacks 4
Height/Weight6'5'', 326
Age21
Shades OfAkiem Hicks, Fletcher Cox

Extraordinarily strong interior lineman who dominates against the run and can create havoc in the pocket

Main Selling Point: Pocket-smashing power
Scouting Report

Brown is built like a brick shit-house, with a massive chest, extremely long arms, and a powerful lower half that combine to create a game-wrecking interior presence. He’s a former five-star recruit and physical marvel with a motor that always runs hot, and is equally devastating playing the run as he is smashing through offensive lines and into the pocket. The Auburn star didn’t miss a tackle all year and was damn near unblockable as a pass rusher, with an explosive first step and bulldozer power to put opposing linemen on skates. He strikes with heavy hands and stuns opponents, using effective spin and swim moves to send offensive linemen lunging for air. He can quickly bound from gap to gap and has the ability to anchor against double-teams. 

Brown has the versatility to line up at nose tackle, at the three-technique spot, or even outside at times. He’s on the ground a bit more than you’d like, but he has the athleticism and power to impact both the run and pass game for a defense.

Why He Could Rise

Brown is a game-wrecking three-down lineman who can stop the run and make opposing quarterbacks’ lives miserable.

Why He Could Fall

He can get knocked off balance when firing out of his stance, and he’ll lose track of the ball from time to time; could be susceptible to trap and wham blocks that take advantage of his aggressive style.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.16
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 8.22
  • Shuttle Time 4.79
  • Vertical Jump 27''
  • Broad Jump 108''
  • Bench Press Reps 28
  • Arm Length 34 2/8''
  • Wingspan 80 7/8''
  • Hand Size 9''
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Mekhi Becton
Las Vegas Raiders

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.1
  • Bench Press Reps 23
  • Arm Length 35 5/8''
  • Wingspan 83 2/8''
  • Hand Size 10 6/8''
12

Mekhi Becton

Tackle

Louisville, junior

  • GMS Games Played 11
  • STRTS Starts 11
  • Sk ALL Sacks Allowed 0
Height/Weight6'7'', 364
Age20
Shades OfBryant McKinnie

Massive yet nimble left tackle who plays with a mean streak in the run game and takes an hour to run around in pass protection

Main Selling Point: Absolute-unit size
Scouting Report

You know that famous picture of Derrick Henry standing next to Mark Ingram? That’s what Becton looks like next to … uh, basically every other offensive and defensive lineman. He’s a former high school basketball star who brings his hardwood skills to the gridiron, displaying quick feet and plenty of bend to mirror in pass protection. He dispatches edge rushers with prejudice, throwing them out of the proverbial club and jumping on top of them for good measure. When he gets his hands on an opponent, he uses his massive 7-foot wingspan to completely engulf them. And he plays with a nasty streak that every offensive line coach will love. 

Becton relies too much on his size and power at times, and will need to refine his techniques in pass protection at the next level. Still, he has physical attributes that you simply can’t teach.

Why He Could Rise

Becton brings elite upside because of his rare combination of size and athleticism.

Why He Could Fall

He’s still raw, and there could be concerns about his ability to stay at his ideal playing weight given his weight fluctuations in college.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.1
  • Bench Press Reps 23
  • Arm Length 35 5/8''
  • Wingspan 83 2/8''
  • Hand Size 10 6/8''
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Javon Kinlaw
San Francisco 49ers
(via IND)

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 34 7/8''
  • Wingspan 83 6/8''
  • Hand Size 10 4/8''
13

Javon Kinlaw

Interior Defensive Lineman

South Carolina, senior

  • TKLS Tackles 35
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 6
  • Sacks Sacks 6
Height/Weight6'5'', 324
Age22
Shades OfChris Jones

Versatile defensive lineman with excellent length, strength, and get-off; consistently creates havoc in the backfield no matter where he lines up

Main Selling Point: Pocket-disrupting power
Scouting Report

Kinlaw has a sturdy base, a muscled upper body, and long, vine-like arms. The first-team AP All-American is a disruptive, penetrating interior defender with an explosive first step who packs a heavy punch that visibly shocks offensive linemen. Kinlaw has racked up 16 tackles for loss, including 10.5 sacks, to go with seven pass deflections over the past two seasons, but those numbers belie his true impact. He’s always a factor, knifing through the line or pushing the pocket to disrupt a quarterback’s dropback or a running back’s lane. 

The senior defensive lineman was a team captain and was honored by teammates with the Tenacity Award (among a handful of other honors), a testament to his ability to keep his hands moving and feet churning even when his first step doesn’t work. Kinlaw can set up at multiple spots along the line and excels behind a solid club-rip move and an effective swim move. He boasts good balance for a big man, showing awareness to avoid cut blocks and stay on his feet. He’s a strong run defender but needs to be more consistent playing with leverage at the point of attack.

Why He Could Rise

Kinlaw is a long, versatile disruptor with a rare combination of power and athleticism; he can use his quickness to shoot gaps and his strength to overpower the lineman in front of him.

Why He Could Fall

He loses ground against double-teams and sometimes gets washed out of the play; he’ll occasionally overrun the action or lose track of the ballcarrier.

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 34 7/8''
  • Wingspan 83 6/8''
  • Hand Size 10 4/8''
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Henry Ruggs III
Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.27
  • Vertical Jump 42''
  • Broad Jump 131''
  • Arm Length 30 4/8''
  • Wingspan 74 4/8''
  • Hand Size 10 1/8''
14

Henry Ruggs III

Wide Receiver

Alabama, junior

  • YDS Yards 746
  • YPR Yards Per Reception 18.7
  • TDS Touchdowns 7
  • REC Receptions 40
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 15
Height/Weight5'11'', 188
Age20
Shades OfMini Martavis Bryant, T.Y. Hilton

Dangerous touchdown machine with elite speed and the ability to create after the catch; still developing intricacies of route-running

Main Selling Point: Field-tilting speed
Scouting Report

Ruggs is an explosive pass catcher with track speed (he broke the Alabama high school state record for the 100-meter dash with a 10.58-second time in 2017) and natural instincts for eluding defenders after the catch. If he gets some green, he’ll take advantage of it; the Crimson Tide standout has excellent acceleration and uses long strides to weave through defenses, annihilate pursuit angles, and pull away from the crowd. The dynamic playmaker followed up a 46-catch, 741-yard, 11-touchdown performance in 2018 with 40 catches for 746 yards and seven touchdowns this season, adding one rushing score to again prove that he’s a high-level touchdown-maker. Ruggs finished at Alabama with 24 of his 98 career receptions ending up in the end zone.

Because of that home-run potential, defensive backs and deep defenders always need to know where Ruggs is lined up―but he’s more than just a straight-line deep threat. The 5-foot-11, 192-pound pass catcher takes advantage of typical cornerback cushions on hitch and stop routes and is a back-shoulder master near the sideline. He’s also a major pain in the ass on crossing routes, where defenders struggle to match his easy speed across the field. While he was durable at Alabama, playing in 40 games, he has a slender, wiry frame that could make him susceptible to big hits at the next level.

Why He Could Rise

Ruggs possesses the type of breakaway speed and run-after-the-catch elusiveness that every offense needs; he’s a touchdown-maker.

Why He Could Fall

He’s raw as a route runner, and never saw a large amount of volume in Alabama’s passing offense.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.27
  • Vertical Jump 42''
  • Broad Jump 131''
  • Arm Length 30 4/8''
  • Wingspan 74 4/8''
  • Hand Size 10 1/8''
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Justin Herbert
Denver Broncos

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.68
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.06
  • Shuttle Time 4.46
  • Vertical Jump 35.5''
  • Broad Jump 123''
  • Arm Length 32 7/8''
  • Wingspan 78 7/8''
  • Hand Size 10''
15

Justin Herbert

Quarterback

Oregon, senior

  • YDS Yards 3471
  • YPA Yards Per Attempt 8.1
  • TDS Touchdowns 32
  • INTS Interceptions 6
  • RTG Passer Rating 156.8
Height/Weight6'6'', 236
Age21
Shades OfRyan Tannehill, Carson Wentz

Tall, strong-armed pocket passer with the tools to develop into a quality starter; needs to improve consistency and decision-making to tap into his potential

Main Selling Point: Big arm, prototypical size
Scouting Report

Herbert is a big-bodied quarterback with a strong arm and playmaking athleticism. The four-year starter has shown remarkable adaptability helming three different schemes under three separate staffs in his career at Oregon (Mark Helfrich’s spread offense, Willie Taggart’s Gulf Coast offense, and Mario Cristobal’s pistol offense), and leaned on his football IQ and natural talent for throwing the ball. The senior passer’s three-sport background shows up on the field: He’s a former high school pitcher (who had a 94 mph fastball, one scout told Sports Illustrated) and basketball player who can power a deep pass through the wind and rain or create with his legs when things break down. Herbert didn’t make the massive jump this season many expected or hoped for, but he did improve from 2018 in every major statistical category, throwing for 3,471 yards, 32 touchdowns, and six interceptions at 8.1 yards per attempt while leading the Ducks to a Rose Bowl win. 

Herbert is comfortable stepping up into the pocket when he senses pressure and keeping his eyes downfield to read the defense. He has an effective head/shoulder fake to freeze defenders and throw to double-move routes; he throws a pretty seam ball, can uncork passes on the move, and has shown flashes of brilliance in the face of pressure. But while the Ducks signal-caller has made plenty of scintillating plays in his college career, consistency is an issue—both in his decision-making and accuracy. He’ll throw a perfectly placed laser downfield then miss a wide-open receiver on the next play. Herbert’s aggressiveness as a passer also seems to wax and wane from game to game. Herbert has suffered a few major injuries, including a broken femur in 2014 and broken collarbone on his non-throwing shoulder in 2017.

Why He Could Rise

Herbert is a smart, adaptable signal-caller with the skill set to develop into a starter a team can build around.

Why He Could Fall

He needs to develop more consistency as a passer and decision-maker; teams may be concerned that he failed to take his game to a new level in 2019.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.68
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.06
  • Shuttle Time 4.46
  • Vertical Jump 35.5''
  • Broad Jump 123''
  • Arm Length 32 7/8''
  • Wingspan 78 7/8''
  • Hand Size 10''
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CJ Henderson
Atlanta Falcons

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.39
  • Vertical Jump 37.5''
  • Broad Jump 127''
  • Bench Press Reps 20
  • Arm Length 31 5/8''
  • Wingspan 75 7/8''
  • Hand Size 9''
16

CJ Henderson

Cornerback

Florida, junior

  • TKLS Tackles 33
  • INTS Interceptions 0
  • PBU Pass Breakups 11
Height/Weight6'1'', 204
Age21
Shades OfWilliam Jackson III

Springy, long-limbed corner with electric footwork, great speed, and natural ball-hawking talent

Main Selling Point: Length and ball skills
Scouting Report

Henderson is a highly athletic cornerback with a lean, angular frame and long arms. The Florida star plays with a balanced base and uses an effective jam in press coverage but seems most comfortable playing off coverage with his eyes on the quarterback, where he can monitor the action, decipher route combinations, and break on passes. He uses quick footwork to mirror his receiver, consistently staying in lockstep with his opponent, and is a deft blitzer, exploding past would-be blockers to get to the quarterback. Henderson uses his length well in coverage: While he wasn’t targeted frequently, he showed some intriguing ball skills, undercutting receivers to reach around or past them to bat the ball down or rake it out of their hands before they can complete the catch. 

Henderson went pick-less in 2019 but notched six interceptions in his Florida career, to go with 20 passes defensed. His physicality at the catch point can be a double-edged sword, though, and his tendency to get grabby could get him in trouble at the next level. And while he has incredible weight room strength (the junior defensive back reportedly benches 380 pounds and squats 545 pounds), he may need to be more consistently physical against the run at the next level.

Why He Could Rise

Henderson has top-tier speed, playmaking instincts, and the competitive swagger to start early in his career.

Why He Could Fall

His production dropped in 2019 and he showed inconsistency as a tackler.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.39
  • Vertical Jump 37.5''
  • Broad Jump 127''
  • Bench Press Reps 20
  • Arm Length 31 5/8''
  • Wingspan 75 7/8''
  • Hand Size 9''
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Patrick Queen
Dallas Cowboys

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.50
  • Vertical Jump 35''
  • Broad Jump 125''
  • Bench Press Reps 18
  • Arm Length 31 5/8''
  • Wingspan 76 7/8''
  • Hand Size 10''
17

Patrick Queen

Linebacker

LSU, junior

  • TKLS Tackles 85
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 12
  • Sacks Sacks 3
Height/Weight6'0'', 229
Age20
Shades OfRoquan Smith

Undersized but explosive linebacker who boasts excellent play-recognition skills, natural coverage chops, and a tenacious playing demeanor.

Main Selling Point: Sideline-to-sideline speed
Scouting Report

Queen is a smooth, easy-moving athlete with a muscular frame and broad shoulders. The linebacker has extraordinary movement skills; he glides around the field, chasing down run plays or effortlessly flipping his hips and changing directions to stick close to receivers, backs, and tight ends in coverage. Queen is terrific at scanning the field, processing route combinations, and anticipating throws. He’s also an explosive blitzer who descends upon the quarterback with lightning speed. He plays with some vinegar, tackling and hitting all the way to―and often through―the whistle. 

Against the run, Queen can get overwhelmed and washed out of a play at times, but he’s generally smart about using his quickness to offset that weakness. He is also adept at keying on blocking concepts, shooting gaps, and filling run lanes.

Why He Could Rise

Queen has tremendous instincts. An ascending playmaker with easy athleticism, run-stopping physicality, and coverage range to make an impact on all three downs, he’s just scratching the surface of his potential.

Why He Could Fall

He’s a one-year starter who lacks size and takes the occasional bad angle against the run.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.50
  • Vertical Jump 35''
  • Broad Jump 125''
  • Bench Press Reps 18
  • Arm Length 31 5/8''
  • Wingspan 76 7/8''
  • Hand Size 10''
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K’Lavon Chaisson
Miami Dolphins
(via PIT)

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 32 2/8''
  • Wingspan 79 2/8''
  • Hand Size 9 7/8''
18

K'Lavon Chaisson

Edge Rusher

LSU, junior

  • TKLS Tackles 60
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 13.5
  • Sacks Sacks 6.5
Height/Weight6'3'', 254
Age20
Shades OfDanielle Hunter, Josh Allen

Bendy edge rusher with an explosive first step and the flexibility to turn the corner. Still raw and may need to get stronger in the pros.

Main Selling Point: Quick-twitch get-off, agility
Scouting Report

Chaisson has a chiseled frame with an explosion-generating lower half and long, muscled arms. The LSU team captain missed most of the 2018 season with a torn ACL but notched 6.5 sacks, 13.5 TFL, two pass deflections, and a forced fumble in 2019, relying on his superlative athleticism to make life hell for opposing tackles. Chaisson brings schematic versatility, with the ability to play either standing up or with his hand in the dirt, but is relatively raw as a pass rusher, having played the position just two seasons in high school and two seasons in college. He has a lightning-quick first step, Gumby-like flexibility, and a nonstop motor, but there are times when his pass rush plan lacks nuance and he relies on his speed to run past tackles, knife back inside, or try to bull-rush straight into the pocket. With more refinement of his burgeoning club, swim, and long-arm moves, he has the tools to become a dominant NFL pass rusher.

Chaisson is at his best going forward, but he has experience dropping back into coverage and tackling in space. He showcased his electric speed when he chased down Oklahoma wideout CeeDee Lamb in the Peach Bowl (he was the MVP of that game). He sets a strong edge in the run game and can burst through the line to blow plays up in the backfield.

Why He Could Rise

Chaisson has explosiveness and flexibility that you can’t teach; he’s still just scratching the surface of his potential and ended the season on an absolute tear.

Why He Could Fall

He may need time to bulk up at the next level and continue to develop his pass-rush plan. His athleticism didn’t translate to major production, and his career total of just 9.5 sacks could raise some questions.

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 32 2/8''
  • Wingspan 79 2/8''
  • Hand Size 9 7/8''
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Jonathan Taylor
Las Vegas Raiders
(via CHI)

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.39
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.01
  • Shuttle Time 4.24
  • Vertical Jump 36''
  • Broad Jump 123''
  • Bench Press Reps 17
  • Arm Length 31 1/8''
  • Wingspan 75 3/8''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
19

Jonathan Taylor

Running Back

Wisconsin, junior

  • YDS Yards 2003
  • YPC Yards Per Carry 6.3
  • TDS Touchdowns 21
  • REC Receptions 26
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 16
Height/Weight5'10'', 226
Age20
Shades OfNick Chubb

Explosive back with tackle-breaking power, quick feet, and home run speed―but questions about his role in the passing game

Main Selling Point: Elusiveness, breakaway speed
Scouting Report

Taylor is a big, well-proportioned back with massive legs and a broad upper half. The two-time first-team All-American is a tough inside runner with good vision and a knack for finding and exploiting gaps in the defense; he uses quick, staccato chop steps in traffic to keep defenders from squaring him up; and it often looks like he’s skiing moguls when he’s running downhill. Taylor has good balance through contact, keeps his feet firing in a scrum, and frequently falls forward for an extra yard or two after being corralled. 

In the open field, the Wisconsin back is a star and has speed to burn—he’s a two-time high school state champion in the 100 meters—and if the defense gives him an inch, he’ll take a mile. Taylor was incredibly productive for the Badgers, racking up 6,174 rushing yards in his career (the most for any player in a three-year span in college football history) while finding pay dirt 50 times. He’s a solid pass protector who understands assignments and can wall off blitzers. And he’s durable: He never missed a game in college.

Taylor’s utility in the passing game is questionable: He improved drastically in that area in 2019, catching 26 passes for 252 yards and five touchdowns, but registered just 16 receptions combined the prior two seasons at Wisconsin. He’ll have to expand his route tree and catch consistency at the next level to earn passing-down duties. Taylor fumbled 18 times in his three-year career at Wisconsin, losing 15 of them.

Why He Could Rise

Taylor has an uncommon blend of size, speed, and electric footwork; he’s a day one starter with Pro Bowl potential.

Why He Could Fall

With 926 carries in his college career, teams may question the amount of mileage on his tires. Fumbles are a real concern.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.39
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.01
  • Shuttle Time 4.24
  • Vertical Jump 36''
  • Broad Jump 123''
  • Bench Press Reps 17
  • Arm Length 31 1/8''
  • Wingspan 75 3/8''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
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Jeff Gladney
Jacksonville Jaguars
(via LAR)

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.48
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.26
  • Vertical Jump 37.5''
  • Broad Jump 124''
  • Bench Press Reps 17
  • Arm Length 31 7/8''
  • Wingspan 75 2/8''
  • Hand Size 9''
20

Jeff Gladney

Cornerback

TCU, senior

  • TKLS Tackles 31
  • INTS Interceptions 1
  • PBU Pass Breakups 14
Height/Weight5'10'', 191
Age23
Shades OfDarius Slay

Twitchy playmaker with excellent quickness and ball skills in coverage and the ability to pack some punch as a run defender

Main Selling Point: Foot speed and swagger
Scouting Report

Gladney has a wiry frame and long arms but plays with strength that matches his weight-room prowess (he reportedly squats 620 pounds, benches 400 pounds, and power-cleans 400). The Horned Frogs playmaker has the combination of very quick feet and oily hips that make him effective in both press-man and off-coverage looks. He’s patient at the line and trusts his own speed, rarely opening his hips too early and allowing receivers to cross him up. He has twitchy movements while mirroring in coverage, and whether playing with inside or outside leverage he has outstanding instincts in anticipating opponents’ routes. He shows good awareness in zone; understands spacing and route combinations to drop into passing lanes, and has excellent flexibility in half-turn technique to strafe toward the middle of the field or toward the sideline without breaking speed or losing balance. The former high school receiver has natural ball skills―both in finding the ball to swat it away or playing his receiver’s hands at the catch point―and recorded three interceptions and 26 pass breakups in the past two seasons. He’s gotten reps lining up over the slot, too.

Why He Could Rise

Gladney has lightning feet, good speed, and instincts in coverage―plus he’s a strong run defender.

Why He Could Fall

He may need to add some bulk to better compete against some of the league’s bigger, more physical receivers.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.48
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.26
  • Vertical Jump 37.5''
  • Broad Jump 124''
  • Bench Press Reps 17
  • Arm Length 31 7/8''
  • Wingspan 75 2/8''
  • Hand Size 9''
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Justin Jefferson
Philadelphia Eagles

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.43
  • Vertical Jump 37.5''
  • Broad Jump 126''
  • Arm Length 33''
  • Wingspan 78''
  • Hand Size 9 1/8''
21

Justin Jefferson

Wide Receiver

LSU, junior

  • YDS Yards 1540
  • YPR Yards Per Reception 13.9
  • TDS Touchdowns 18
  • REC Receptions 111
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 19
Height/Weight6'1'', 202
Age21
Shades OfGangly Doug Baldwin

Competitive slot receiver who uses basketball-like jukes as a route runner and who dominates at the catch point.

Main Selling Point: Quickness and body control
Scouting Report

Jefferson has a tall, sinewy frame and boasts elite short-area quickness. He posted incredible production for national-champion LSU in 2019, breaking a program record with 111 catches while finishing second nationally with 18 touchdowns. Lining up primarily in the slot, Jefferson glides off the line of scrimmage and conjures images of Doug Baldwin as a route runner: He varies the pacing of his route stem, lulls defenders to sleep, and then unleashes a devastating series of crossovers and jab-step jukes to create separation and put corners in a blender. (In one clip, I even saw him deploy a bounding Euro-step midway through a deep crossing route.) 

He’s unflinching over the middle, seeing the ball into his hands even when he knows a hit is coming. After the catch, Jefferson turns upfield and uses long strides to eat up yardage in a hurry. He’s a force at the catch point, too, consistently separating with subtle push-offs or jersey tugs before leaping into the air and contorting to pluck the ball away from defenders.

Much of Jefferson’s college production came against off coverage or zone coverage from the slot, and he benefited from the space that LSU’s spread scheme created. He’ll have to prove early in his NFL career that he’s also adept at beating press coverage and running vertical routes on the outside. There were also times when he allowed physical corners to bump him off his route, and he lacks the speed to take the top off a defense.

Why He Could Rise

Jefferson’s short-area quickness and massive catch radius could help him emerge as a quarterback’s security blanket over the middle and in the red zone.

Why He Could Fall

He lacks precision as a route runner; LSU’s spread offense played to all his strengths, so fit could be important.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.43
  • Vertical Jump 37.5''
  • Broad Jump 126''
  • Arm Length 33''
  • Wingspan 78''
  • Hand Size 9 1/8''
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Xavier McKinney
Minnesota Vikings
(via BUF)

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.63
  • Vertical Jump 36''
  • Broad Jump 122''
  • Bench Press Reps 19
  • Arm Length 30 7/8''
  • Wingspan 75 4/8''
  • Hand Size 8 5/8''
22

Xavier McKinney

Safety

Alabama, junior

  • TKLS Tackles 95
  • INTS Interceptions 3
  • PBU Pass Breakups 5
Height/Weight6'0'', 201
Age20
Shades OfMalcolm Jenkins

Rangy playmaker with the ability to line up deep, in the box, or over the slot; brings reliability as a tackler and flexibility in coverage

Main Selling Point: Versatility and ball skills
Scouting Report

McKinney has a long, slender frame and the versatility to play in multiple spots on a defense. He has experience playing deep in two- or one-high looks, over the slot, and on the edge as a blitzer. A semifinalist for the Jim Thorpe Award (presented annually to the nation’s top defensive back), McKinney was asked to do it all in Alabama’s scheme: He ran from sideline to sideline, covered receivers out of the slot, and flew through gaps as a blitzer. He closes incredibly quickly on ball carriers and delivers some pop as a tackler. He’s shown good ball skills, ripping the ball away from pass catchers or reaching into passing lanes, and has strong instincts to recognize the play and react instantly. McKinney racked up a team-high 95 tackles in 2019—5.5 going for a loss—adding three sacks, three picks, five passes defensed, and four forced fumbles. He notched six tackles for a loss, two interceptions, 10 passes defensed, and two forced fumbles in 2018. Put more simply: He just makes plays.

Why He Could Rise

McKinney brings a deploy-him-all-over-the-field versatility and an aggressive demeanor as a tackler.

Why He Could Fall

He may lack the pure speed to play single-high safety at the next level, and a multiple robber-type role that asks him to fly downhill and play over the slot could be his best fit.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.63
  • Vertical Jump 36''
  • Broad Jump 122''
  • Bench Press Reps 19
  • Arm Length 30 7/8''
  • Wingspan 75 4/8''
  • Hand Size 8 5/8''
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J.K. Dobbins
New England Patriots

Combine Results

  • Bench Press Reps 23
  • Arm Length 29 6/8''
  • Wingspan 73 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
23

J.K. Dobbins

Running Back

Ohio State, junior

  • YDS Yards 2003
  • YPC Yards Per Carry 6.7
  • TDS Touchdowns 21
  • REC Receptions 23
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 24
Height/Weight5'9'', 209
Age21
Shades OfDoug Martin, Josh Jacobs

Versatile back with good size, excellent vision, top-tier acceleration, and sought-after pass-catching chops

Main Selling Point: Three-down skill set
Scouting Report

Dobbins has a compact, muscle-hamstery frame, plays with a low center of gravity, and powers through arm tackles with impressive lower-body explosiveness. He knows how to absorb contact and stay upright, is crafty at picking the right running lanes, and uses his Ferrari-like burst to explode through small openings and into the open field. He’s an urgent, one-cut runner who wastes little motion, planting his foot to get downhill in the blink of an eye. He enjoyed his best season for the Buckeyes in 2019, rushing for 2,003 yards with 21 touchdowns (both tied for third nationally), while finishing tied for second in both 20-plus- (20) and 50-plus-yard runs (six). He was an explosive play and touchdown creator at the highest level, and did his best work in big games: He closed his college career by rushing for 157 yards against Penn State, 211 against Michigan, 172 against Wisconsin, and 174 against Clemson. 

Dobbins is also a reliable, natural pass catcher―he caught 71 passes for 645 yards with five scores in three seasons at Ohio State―and he has every-down potential in the NFL. He proved capable of shouldering a heavy load, too; he never missed a game in his Buckeyes tenure. His biggest weakness is pass protection: While he can lay licks on oncoming blitzers, he missed a few assignments in that area as well.

Why He Could Rise

Dobbins has the athleticism, elusiveness, and passing-game skill set to become an impact NFL starter from day one.

Why He Could Fall

He isn’t a big, bruising type who will regularly push a pile, and lapses in pass protection could limit his third-down utility.

Combine Results

  • Bench Press Reps 23
  • Arm Length 29 6/8''
  • Wingspan 73 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
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D'Andre Swift
New Orleans Saints

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.48
  • Vertical Jump 35.5''
  • Broad Jump 121''
  • Arm Length 29 7/8''
  • Wingspan 72''
  • Hand Size 9''
24

D'Andre Swift

Running Back

Georgia, junior

  • YDS Yards 1218
  • YPC Yards Per Carry 6.2
  • TDS Touchdowns 7
  • REC Receptions 24
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 15
Height/Weight5'8'', 212
Age21
Shades OfDalvin Cook, Duke Johnson

Creative, instinctive runner who’s slippery between the tackles, elusive in the open field, and dynamic in the passing game―but may not be a workhorse back in the NFL

Main Selling Point: Versatility, vision
Scouting Report

Swift has a compact, muscled-up frame with smooth athleticism, excellent balance, and lightning-quick suddenness in his cuts. He’s not a big-time bruiser, but he can make hay between the tackles with quick footwork and the ability to slither through creases. He runs downhill when he needs to—he’s not afraid to mix it up in the briar patch—but has the speed and vision to bounce it to the outside when space opens up. He uses choppy steps, effective head and shoulder fakes, and good hesitation and spin moves to juke defenders and create yards at the second level. Swift is a very good pass catcher and capable of running routes from all over the formation. He’s a natural hands catcher and playmaking talent after the catch. 

Swift rushed for 2,267 yards and 17 touchdowns in the past two seasons at Georgia, adding 56 catches for 513 yards and four scores through the air, but his ability to carry a heavy load in the NFL could be a concern. He never carried the ball more than 25 times in a game in college, eclipsing 20 carries just three times.

Why He Could Rise

Swift is a dynamic playmaker with the skill set to play on all three downs, and he should contribute early in the ground game and passing attack.

Why He Could Fall

He’s never carried a heavy workload and some teams may view him as a committee back.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.48
  • Vertical Jump 35.5''
  • Broad Jump 121''
  • Arm Length 29 7/8''
  • Wingspan 72''
  • Hand Size 9''
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Tee Higgins
Minnesota Vikings

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 34 1/8''
  • Wingspan 81''
  • Hand Size 9 2/8''
25

Tee Higgins

Wide Receiver

Clemson, junior

  • YDS Yards 1167
  • YPR Yards Per Reception 19.8
  • TDS Touchdowns 13
  • REC Receptions 59
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 22
Height/Weight6'4'', 216
Age20
Shades OfDeVante Parker, Kenny Golladay

Fluid big-play threat who separates late and catches everything in his area code

Main Selling Point: Catch radius, smooth athleticism
Scouting Report

Higgins is a big, confident wideout with a massive catch radius and exceptional focus on contested passes. The 6-foot-4, 205-pound junior caught 59 passes for 1,167 yards and 13 touchdowns in 2019, eclipsing his 936-yard, 12-touchdown line from the season prior. He’s a dangerous deep threat who averaged 19.8 yards per reception last season―good for 13th among FBS players―and uses his long arms, strong hands, and top-tier body control to reach out over defenders and pluck passes out of the air. Higgins isn’t super sudden and doesn’t possess elite speed, but he has quick feet to beat press coverage and wins with his ability to separate late in his routes; he understands leverage and how to keep defenders on his hip until the ball arrives. He has dependable hands, with just six drops on 120 catchable passes in the past two seasons, per PFF.

Why He Could Rise

Higgins has the ability to take the top off a defense and win at the catch point; he’s got the skill-set to develop into a quarterback’s best friend on third downs and in the red zone.

Why He Could Fall

He lacks top-tier speed and could struggle to separate early in his routes.

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 34 1/8''
  • Wingspan 81''
  • Hand Size 9 2/8''
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Jalen Reagor
Miami Dolphins
(via HOU)

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.47
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.31
  • Shuttle Time 4.46
  • Vertical Jump 42''
  • Broad Jump 138''
  • Bench Press Reps 17
  • Arm Length 31 3/8''
  • Wingspan 74 3/8''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
26

Jalen Reagor

Wide Receiver

TCU, junior

  • YDS Yards 611
  • YPR Yards Per Reception 14.2
  • TDS Touchdowns 5
  • REC Receptions 43
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 9
Height/Weight5'11'', 206
Age21
Shades OfStefon Diggs, Percy Harvin

Electric pass catcher with turbo acceleration and surprising high-point skills whose production dropped in 2019

Main Selling Point: Rocket-booster speed
Scouting Report

Reagor is a muscled-up pass catcher with a compact frame that’s built for the NFL. His track background is apparent on tape―he’s a smooth athlete with incredible explosiveness in the short area and the top-end speed to take the top off a defense. The junior pass catcher made Bruce Feldman's preseason “Freaks List” thanks to his incredible weight-room prowess, including a 620-pound squat, a 380-pound bench, and a 380-pound clean. For context, Saquon Barkley and his tree-trunk quads squat 650 pounds

The Horned Frogs star has some drops on his tape, but at 5-foot-10 and 196 pounds, he’s surprisingly adept at going up and making tough catches away from his body in traffic, displaying good high-point timing and concentration to reel balls in. Reagor is a shifty return man with jitterbug quicks that help him find daylight, and averaged 20.8 yards per return on punts in 2019. His receiving numbers were anything but jaw-dropping in 2019 thanks in part to subpar quarterback play, and his 43 catches for 611 yards and five touchdowns represented a disappointing dropoff from the season prior, when he posted a 72-catch, 1,061-yard, nine-touchdown line while adding 170 yards and two scores on the ground. But context for Reagor’s statistical setback is important: As a team, TCU’s offense netted just 2,444 passing yards and 15 total passing touchdowns in 2019―giving Reagor a 25-percent yardage share and 33-percent touchdown share of that unit.

Why He Could Rise

Reagor is an explosive playmaker who’s dangerous on sweeps, screens, and handoffs—and he has the speed to take the top off a defense on the outside.

Why He Could Fall

His drops could be a concern, and he will need to expand and refine his route tree at the next level.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.47
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.31
  • Shuttle Time 4.46
  • Vertical Jump 42''
  • Broad Jump 138''
  • Bench Press Reps 17
  • Arm Length 31 3/8''
  • Wingspan 74 3/8''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
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Kenneth Murray
Seattle Seahawks

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.52
  • Vertical Jump 38''
  • Broad Jump 129''
  • Bench Press Reps 21
  • Arm Length 32 6/8''
  • Wingspan 80''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
27

Kenneth Murray

Linebacker

Oklahoma, junior

  • TKLS Tackles 102
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 17
  • Sacks Sacks 4
Height/Weight6'2'', 241
Age21
Shades OfDeion Jones

Rangy and ferocious off-ball linebacker who fits the modern game; he tackles, blitzes, and has the athleticism to cover―but needs more discipline

Main Selling Point: Sideline-to-sideline speed
Scouting Report

Murray has a chiseled frame with long arms and a solid lower half. The Sooners defensive captain has racked up 325 tackles—36.5 of them for a loss—to go with 9.5 sacks in three seasons, using turbo-boosted acceleration to close on ball-carriers in interior gaps or range from sideline to sideline on outside runs. The junior linebacker is excellent as a blitzer, flying downhill like a bolt of lightning, and is smooth in his coverage drops. Murray doesn’t have a ton of experience in man-coverage looks, but has the speed and size to carry running backs and tight ends downfield. 

Murray plays with his hair on fire, which has led him to misdiagnose plays or miss his gap at times, or overpursue at others. He cleaned up his tackling in 2019 after missing 20 tackles in 2018, but still has a tendency to come in and meet opponents too high, something he’ll have to improve at the next level.

Why He Could Rise

Murray is a three-down linebacker with the range and twitchy athleticism to make plays all over the field.

Why He Could Fall

He’s inconsistent in play-recognition and instincts, and he’ll have to prove he can cover man-to-man in the NFL.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.52
  • Vertical Jump 38''
  • Broad Jump 129''
  • Bench Press Reps 21
  • Arm Length 32 6/8''
  • Wingspan 80''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
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A.J. Epenesa
Baltimore Ravens

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.04
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.34
  • Shuttle Time 4.46
  • Vertical Jump 32.5''
  • Broad Jump 117''
  • Bench Press Reps 17
  • Arm Length 34 4/8''
  • Wingspan 81 2/8''
  • Hand Size 10 1/8''
28

A.J. Epenesa

Edge Rusher

Iowa, junior

  • TKLS Tackles 49
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 14.5
  • Sacks Sacks 11.5
Height/Weight6'5'', 275
Age21
Shades OfArik Armstead

Power-based defensive lineman with heavy hands and an NFL-ready frame; immovable on the edge and has the size and strength to rush inside on passing downs

Main Selling Point: Uncommon strength
Scouting Report

Epenesa is a big, rugged defensive end prospect with a muscular frame, long arms, and shockingly heavy hands. The former three-sport athlete―who also starred in high school in basketball and set an Illinois record in discus―plays like the football equivalent of a power forward, throwing his weight around while bringing an intimidating presence to the trenches as both a rusher and a run defender. He uses his arms like clubs to swipe away blocks and has a devastating long-arm stab, which he uses to just about lift offensive tackles off their feet as he walks them backward into the pocket. 

The Iowa star racked up 11.5 sacks in 2019 after posting 10.5 the year prior. He also notched 30.5 tackles for a loss, six passes defensed, and eight forced fumbles over the past two seasons. Epenesa has a good first step, but lacks speed and his rush can sometimes stall out at the top. If he tries for the edge and doesn’t get there, he can end up being stalemated out of a play.

Why He Could Rise

Epenesa controls opponents with overwhelming force; he brings the versatility to be a plug-and-play contributor on the edge or the inside and can play on all three downs.

Why He Could Fall

He has size but isn’t super explosive as a rusher. He’ll need to further develop his complement of power-based moves.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.04
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.34
  • Shuttle Time 4.46
  • Vertical Jump 32.5''
  • Broad Jump 117''
  • Bench Press Reps 17
  • Arm Length 34 4/8''
  • Wingspan 81 2/8''
  • Hand Size 10 1/8''
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Yetur Gross-Matos
Tennessee Titans

Combine Results

  • Vertical Jump 34''
  • Broad Jump 120''
  • Bench Press Reps 20
  • Arm Length 34 7/8''
  • Wingspan 82 2/8''
  • Hand Size 9 6/8''
29

Yetur Gross-Matos

Edge Rusher

Penn State, junior

  • TKLS Tackles 40
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 15
  • Sacks Sacks 9.5
Height/Weight6'5'', 266
Age21
Shades OfMontez Sweat

Long-levered defensive end with the size and explosiveness to develop into an elite pass rusher

Main Selling Point: Length and athletic upside
Scouting Report

Gross-Matos is a tall, high-cut edge rusher with a nice get-off and the ability to set a strong edge. He’s an effective pass rusher and run defender who posted at least 8.0 sacks in each of the past two seasons and 33.5 tackles for loss in that 23-game stretch (including 20.0 in 2018). The Penn State standout has extremely long arms that give him a reach advantage against just about every opponent he faces; he knows how to keep offensive linemen at bay and boasts a massive tackling radius. He hits like a Mack truck when he gets a line on the quarterback and shows flashes of good bend to turn the corner or duck beneath a block. 

Gross-Matos should offer some positional and schematic versatility. He has the athleticism and length to play either side in a four-man front, bump inside to play the three-technique spot in nickel situations, or line up on the edge as an outside linebacker. But he may need to bulk up and refine his pass-rushing repertoire to excel in any scheme.

Why He Could Rise

Gross-Matos has top-tier upside thanks to a rare blend of length and explosiveness; he’s still just scratching the surface of his potential as an edge defender.

Why He Could Fall

He was named in a recently filed hazing lawsuit. The suit says Gross-Matos and others “facilitated a campaign to harass and haze the lowerclassmen.”

Combine Results

  • Vertical Jump 34''
  • Broad Jump 120''
  • Bench Press Reps 20
  • Arm Length 34 7/8''
  • Wingspan 82 2/8''
  • Hand Size 9 6/8''
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Grant Delpit
Green Bay Packers

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 30 3/8''
  • Wingspan 74 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9 1/8''
30

Grant Delpit

Safety

LSU, junior

  • TKLS Tackles 65
  • INTS Interceptions 2
  • PBU Pass Breakups 7
Height/Weight6'2'', 213
Age21
Shades OfMinkah Fitzpatrick

Versatile safety who lines up all over the secondary and always seems to know where the football is going; tackling became a major issue in 2019

Main Selling Point: Range and ball-hawking talent
Scouting Report

Delpit is a quick-twitch defensive back with a wiry frame and top-tier length. The Jim Thorpe Award winner (given to the nation’s best defensive back) and second-team AP All-American moves all over the formation, playing deep, over the slot, and in the box. He delivers big hits in run support and is an explosive blitzer who shoots gaps and makes plays in the backfield. It’s Delpit’s play-recognition skills, though, that separate him from the field: He reads route combinations and quarterbacks’ eyes, jumping routes or putting himself in a position to make a play. In coverage, he can flip his hips and run with pass catchers, turn and find the ball like cornerback, and break up or intercept the pass. He has excellent range and ball skills, and has netted seven picks, 16 passes defensed, seven sacks, and 139 tackles in the past two seasons. 

Tackling became a big red flag for the junior playmaker this season, though, with Delpit missing at least one tackle in all but one game. He’ll have to clean up that issue and avoid relying too much on shoulder shivers when trying to get off blocks; he’s too easily sealed out of the play at times.

Why He Could Rise

Delpit displayed rare coverage instincts, and has the athleticism to be a factor against the run and as a blizter.

Why He Could Fall

He missed far too many tackles last season.

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 30 3/8''
  • Wingspan 74 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9 1/8''
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Jordan Love
San Francisco 49ers

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.74
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.21
  • Shuttle Time 4.52
  • Vertical Jump 35.5''
  • Broad Jump 118''
  • Arm Length 32 5/8''
  • Wingspan 80''
  • Hand Size 10 4/8''
31

Jordan Love

Quarterback

Utah State, redshirt junior

  • YDS Yards 3402
  • YPA Yards Per Attempt 7.2
  • TDS Touchdowns 20
  • INTS Interceptions 17
  • RTG Passer Rating 129.1
Height/Weight6'4'', 224
Age21
Shades OfYOLO Marcus Mariota

Dynamic signal-caller with a flick-of-the-wrist throwing style, good touch, and plenty of athleticism―but big questions around his decision-making and ball security

Main Selling Point: Tools, tools, tools
Scouting Report

Love is as big of a traits-based prospect as we’ll see in this draft. The 6-foot-3, 224-pound quarterback has prototypical size, athleticism, and a strong arm but took a massive step back statistically this year (partially due to a coaching change and a lack of surrounding talent). He tossed 20 touchdowns to 17 interceptions after posting a 32-to-6 touchdown-to-interception line the season prior. But his skill set and potential ceiling as a passer are sure to intrigue a few teams―and it’s notable that less-than-impressive final stat lines didn’t cause Josh Allen or Daniel Jones to fall too far in recent years. 

Love has showed off flashes of incredible touch and precise ball placement to every level of the field while operating primarily in a shotgun offense; he has the ability to manipulate defenders with his eyes; he has a pretty, catchable deep ball; and he shows willingness to attempt tight-window throws against one-on-one coverage. He throws well on the move, and when plays break down, he has the athleticism to pick up yards on the ground (he ran for 403 yards and scored nine touchdowns in three seasons at Utah State). Love can strafe, backpedal, and keep himself in a throwing posture while avoiding the rush in a muddied pocket, and he never seems fazed―even when the gates of hell apparently open up in the stands

That said, Love’s big plays are too often punctuated by poor ones. His ball placement is erratic at times, which is a trait that could get him in trouble. He has the ability to toggle through throws of varying velocity, but there were times when his default was to loft up a rainbow when a bullet throw was necessary. Overall, Love created far too many turnovers, and appeared to predetermine his targets while ignoring coverages.

Why He Could Rise

Love has scintillating arm talent and a high ceiling as a passer; his skill set should translate well to the combine and pro day environments.

Why He Could Fall

He comes with a low floor, he turned the ball over far, far too much in 2019, and he may need some time as a backup to refine his game.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.74
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.21
  • Shuttle Time 4.52
  • Vertical Jump 35.5''
  • Broad Jump 118''
  • Arm Length 32 5/8''
  • Wingspan 80''
  • Hand Size 10 4/8''
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Jaylon Johnson
Kansas City Chiefs

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.50
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.01
  • Shuttle Time 4.13
  • Vertical Jump 36.5''
  • Broad Jump 124''
  • Bench Press Reps 15
  • Arm Length 31 3/8''
  • Wingspan 74 3/8''
  • Hand Size 9 3/8''
32

Jaylon Johnson

Cornerback

Utah, junior

  • TKLS Tackles 36
  • INTS Interceptions 2
  • PBU Pass Breakups 11
Height/Weight6'0'', 193
Age20
Shades OfTrayvon Mullen

Physical, athletic cornerback who excels in press coverage, lurks in off coverage, can work in the slot, and tackles well.

Main Selling Point: Length and physicality
Scouting Report

Johnson has a sturdy frame with long arms. The second-team AP All-American plays with plenty of patience in press coverage, avoiding opening his hips too early or false-stepping to let a receiver get by him. He uses a two-handed jam to disrupt wideouts and throw off timing routes. He’s extremely physical inside of 5 yards, and relies on his quick feet and oily hips to transition from a backpedal to a trailing position. Johnson has a good feel for passing off and taking over coverage responsibilities in zone looks, and has proved comfortable in multiple techniques, whether he’s playing tight press coverage or giving a cushion in off looks, when he’s good at reading a quarterback’s eyes and breaking on passes. 

Johnson surrendered a passer rating of 52 in coverage at Utah, per Pro Football Focus, and allowed only 44.6 percent of the targets thrown his way to be completed. He gave up three touchdowns on 944 coverage snaps. He showed off ball-hawking talent as well, picking off six passes and breaking up another 15 between the 2018 and 2019 seasons. He can play over the slot at times, and is a notably strong tackler.

Why He Could Rise

Johnson has an enticing combination of size, length, athleticism, and coverage instincts; he has day-one starter potential.

Why He Could Fall

He’s a reliable tackler, but is sometimes content to let his teammates do the dirty work; he needs to learn to be more subtle with his hands down the field.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.50
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.01
  • Shuttle Time 4.13
  • Vertical Jump 36.5''
  • Broad Jump 124''
  • Bench Press Reps 15
  • Arm Length 31 3/8''
  • Wingspan 74 3/8''
  • Hand Size 9 3/8''
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Zack Baun
Cincinnati Bengals

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.65
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.00
  • Shuttle Time 4.31
  • Vertical Jump 32.5''
  • Broad Jump 115''
  • Bench Press Reps 24
  • Arm Length 32 6/8''
  • Wingspan 78 2/8''
  • Hand Size 9 5/8''
33

Zack Baun

Edge Rusher

Wisconsin, redshirt senior

  • TKLS Tackles 76
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 19.5
  • Sacks Sacks 12.5
Height/Weight6'2'', 238
Age23
Shades OfKyle Van Noy

Dynamic edge rusher with a natural feel for dropping back into coverage.

Main Selling Point: Versatility and athleticism
Scouting Report

Baun is a highly athletic, versatile defender who brings an explosive first step as a pass rusher and fluidity and instincts in coverage. He posted a breakout campaign in 2019, racking up 19.5 tackles for a loss, including 12.5 sacks―finishing behind only Chase Young in the Big Ten in both metrics. The Wisconsin product’s background as a high school sprinter, basketball star, and dual-threat quarterback shows up in his game: His quick-twitch get-off causes problems for slower opposing linemen, he can dip and bend around the corner, and he has a burgeoning spin move. 

Baun is tough and physical when setting the edge against the run, and he anticipates route combinations when dropping back off the line. He reads the quarterback’s eyes to jump into passing lanes, too―as he did on this pick-six against Michigan State in 2019. Baun may lack the size and power to play as a full-time NFL edge rusher, but his athleticism, schematic versatility, and three-down skill set should make him an intriguing wild-card piece for an innovative defensive coordinator.

Why He Could Rise

Baun has the athleticism, savvy, and versatility to shine in multiple roles for a defense.

Why He Could Fall

Some teams may see him as a tweener who’s too small to play as a full-time hand-in-the-dirt pass rusher. He posted just one season of elite college production.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.65
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.00
  • Shuttle Time 4.31
  • Vertical Jump 32.5''
  • Broad Jump 115''
  • Bench Press Reps 24
  • Arm Length 32 6/8''
  • Wingspan 78 2/8''
  • Hand Size 9 5/8''
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Neville Gallimore
Indianapolis Colts
(via WAS)

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.79
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.97
  • Shuttle Time 5.01
  • Bench Press Reps 23
  • Arm Length 32 6/8''
  • Wingspan 77 2/8''
  • Hand Size 9 5/8''
34

Neville Gallimore

Interior Defensive Lineman

Oklahoma, redshirt senior

  • TKLS Tackles 30
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 7.5
  • Sacks Sacks 4
Height/Weight6'2'', 304
Age22
Shades OfGeno Atkins

Powerful interior defensive lineman with a turbo-charged get-off, top-tier athleticism, and a handful of go-to moves in creating havoc in the pocket

Main Selling Point: Explosiveness and agility
Scouting Report

Gallimore is a stout, powerful defensive lineman with long arms, tree trunks for legs, and the ability to line up at multiple spots on the interior. He plays with a low center of gravity and an energetic style that’s not only contagious for the whole defense, but makes me want to go run through a wall. The Canada native is an absurdly strong big man who reportedly bench presses 500 pounds, squats 800 pounds, and power cleans 405 pounds. He has incredible explosiveness as well as people-moving strength, and uncoils out of his stance to shoot gaps and power through the line. He’s developed effective rip, swim, and spin moves that regularly leave offensive linemen lunging for clouds of dust, and always keeps his feet and hands churning. Gallimore looks like he’s playing at a different speed than anyone in the trenches; he’s capable of chasing runs down the line and moves in space with ease. 

However, Gallimore’s production didn’t always match his eye-popping athleticism—he notched 12.5 tackles for loss, seven sacks, and four forced fumbles in the past two seasons combined. He’ll need to prove he can turn his explosiveness into impact plays at the next level. He’s on the short side to play anywhere but on the nose or at the three-technique spot.

Why He Could Rise

Gallimore is an extraordinary athlete with the explosiveness, motor, and repertoire of moves to become a game-wrecker from the inside.

Why He Could Fall

His production was disappointing and his lack of length could limit where’s deployed.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.79
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.97
  • Shuttle Time 5.01
  • Bench Press Reps 23
  • Arm Length 32 6/8''
  • Wingspan 77 2/8''
  • Hand Size 9 5/8''
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Josh Jones
Detroit Lions

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.27
  • Vertical Jump 28.5''
  • Broad Jump 109''
  • Bench Press Reps 24
  • Arm Length 33 7/8''
  • Wingspan 79 7/8''
  • Hand Size 10 1/8''
35

Josh Jones

Tackle

Houston, redshirt senior

  • GMS Games Played 9
  • STRTS Starts 9
  • Sk ALL Sacks Allowed 1
Height/Weight6'5'', 319
Age22
Shades OfTerron Armstead

Long offensive lineman with light feet, smooth athleticism, and the potential to develop into a stalwart at left tackle.

Main Selling Point: Blindside-blocking upside
Scouting Report

Jones has a muscular, athletic build and long arms. He’s light-footed and balanced in his pass set, and the former high school basketball star mirrors opponents like he’s defending slashers around the perimeter. He has good knee bend and quick reactions to keep opposing rushers at bay. Jones allowed just four pressures during the 2019 season, according to PFF, and had a strong week of practice at the Senior Bowl (he won North Squad Practice Player of the Week honors), stymying pass rushers in one-on-one drills. 

There are times when Jones misses on his punch or strikes too late, but he showed flashes of good hand-fighting skills and his effort is unwavering. He’ll have to clean up his footwork at the next level, but has the body control and length to be a quality NFL pass blocker. Jones moves easily when pulling or blocking in space and keeps his feet churning in the run game. He’s durable, too, making 45 starts at left tackle for Houston over the past four seasons.

Why He Could Rise

Jones possesses an intriguing combination of athleticism, size, and nastiness in the trenches; he’s got the feet to play left tackle in the NFL.

Why He Could Fall

He’s still developing his technique, lacks brute force at the point of attack, and may fit best in zone- or pulling-oriented blocking systems.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.27
  • Vertical Jump 28.5''
  • Broad Jump 109''
  • Bench Press Reps 24
  • Arm Length 33 7/8''
  • Wingspan 79 7/8''
  • Hand Size 10 1/8''
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Trevon Diggs
New York Giants

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 32 6/8''
  • Wingspan 78 3/8''
  • Hand Size 9 3/8''
36

Trevon Diggs

Cornerback

Alabama, senior

  • TKLS Tackles 37
  • INTS Interceptions 3
  • PBU Pass Breakups 8
Height/Weight6'1'', 205
Age22
Shades OfXavien Howard

Well-built and stingy cover corner with a prototypical blend of size, speed, and physicality

Main Selling Point: Size and athleticism
Scouting Report

Diggs has a solid, muscled frame and top-tier athleticism. The former receiver and younger brother of Stefon Diggs played in all three phases for the Crimson Tide as a true freshman in 2016 before making the switch to corner as a sophomore, showing he’s capable of muscling up bigger pass catchers over the past three seasons. Diggs shows excellent awareness in zone, reads route combos, and jumps into passing lanes (as he did on a pick-six vs. Arkansas), and gave up just 13 receptions all season, according to PFF, notching eight passes defensed, three picks, and a pair of fumble recoveries. 

As should be expected from someone who made a position change in college, Diggs is relatively raw at the position. He is best when using his size and physicality at the line of scrimmage and has receiver-like ball skills, but is inconsistent looking back for the ball in coverage. He isn’t as physical as he could be against the run. He missed nine games in 2018 with a broken foot.

Why He Could Rise

Diggs has the frame and athletic talent to develop into a shutdown corner in the NFL.

Why He Could Fall

He’s still perfecting his technique, can improve as a run defender, and may fit best on teams that employ press-man and Cover-3 looks.

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 32 6/8''
  • Wingspan 78 3/8''
  • Hand Size 9 3/8''
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Kristian Fulton
Los Angeles Chargers

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.46
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 6.94
  • Shuttle Time 4.36
  • Vertical Jump 35.5''
  • Broad Jump 123''
  • Arm Length 30 5/8''
  • Wingspan 71 7/8''
  • Hand Size 9 1/8''
37

Kristian Fulton

Cornerback

LSU, senior

  • TKLS Tackles 38
  • INTS Interceptions 1
  • PBU Pass Breakups 14
Height/Weight6'0'', 197
Age21
Shades OfA.J. Bouye, Chidobe Awuzie

Well-built cornerback with excellent instincts, a knack for consistently tight coverage, and good ball skills

Main Selling Point: Sticky coverage talent
Scouting Report

Fulton has a muscular frame, good athleticism, and plenty of length. The former five-star recruit plays with excellent balance and wastes no movements when backpedaling or flipping his hips in coverage. He rarely gives up much separation in man coverage looks―sticking close to opponents with a combination of quickness and route anticipation—and has the speed to hang with receivers all the way down the field. In zone looks, he shows good instincts, reading the quarterback’s eyes to jump routes and put himself in a position to make a play. Fulton broke up 14 passes (tied for eighth among all defenders) and notched one pick and 31 tackles in 13 games in 2019. While Fulton can play with physicality in press, his tackling often lacks oomph. He missed the 2017 season to suspension after tampering with an NCAA drug test.

Why He Could Rise

Fulton has an ideal blend of size and speed and is incredibly sticky in coverage.

Why He Could Fall

He is not a tough, physical tackler and it may be a red flag for some teams that he struggled in coverage against Clemson in the national championship game.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.46
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 6.94
  • Shuttle Time 4.36
  • Vertical Jump 35.5''
  • Broad Jump 123''
  • Arm Length 30 5/8''
  • Wingspan 71 7/8''
  • Hand Size 9 1/8''
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Jordan Elliott
Carolina Panthers

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.02
  • Shuttle Time 4.73
  • Vertical Jump 27.5''
  • Bench Press Reps 24
  • Arm Length 32 3/8''
  • Wingspan 79''
  • Hand Size 10 2/8''
38

Jordan Elliott

Interior Defensive Lineman

Missouri, redshirt junior

  • TKLS Tackles 44
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 8.5
  • Sacks Sacks 2.5
Height/Weight6'4'', 302
Age22
Shades OfMichael Bennett

Long, athletic defensive lineman with the ability to line up at multiple spots and penetrate into the backfield.

Main Selling Point: Chaos-creating disruption
Scouting Report

Elliott has a tall, athletic frame, a sturdy lower half, and big, powerful arms. The versatile defensive lineman started his college career at Texas before transferring to Missouri in 2017, sitting out a season before establishing himself as a consistent playmaker for the Tigers. He was named a second-team AP All-American in 2019 after registering 8.5 tackles for a loss, including 2.5 sacks, to go with three pass knockdowns. Among FBS interior defensive linemen with at least 250 pass rush snaps, he ranked first in pass rush win rate (18.1 percent), according to Pro Football Focus. 

He has good first-step quickness, firing out of his stance to shoot through gaps or bull rush opponents. He coordinates his initial lower-body explosion with effective hand chops and swipes to leave offensive linemen lunging. He also keeps his feet moving at all times, helping him avoid stalemates and drive offensive linemen back into the pocket. 

Against the run, Elliott can lock his arms out to control blocking attempts, keeping linemen off his body while scanning the backfield to chase down the ballcarrier. He has the athleticism to run down plays from the backside, too. He’s susceptible to getting washed out of the play when taking on double-teams, though, and his rushing style can be haphazard—he’s prone to firing out of his stance so hard that he drops his head and loses sight of the ball or the quarterback.

Why He Could Rise

Elliott checks a lot of boxes as an early impact defensive lineman: He has the ability to line up in multiple spots, the athleticism to shoot gaps, the length to get his hands up to disrupt passing lanes, and the power and awareness to stop the run.

Why He Could Fall

His sack production leaves something to be desired (he had just 5.5 over the past two seasons), and he may need to play with more discipline at the next level.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.02
  • Shuttle Time 4.73
  • Vertical Jump 27.5''
  • Bench Press Reps 24
  • Arm Length 32 3/8''
  • Wingspan 79''
  • Hand Size 10 2/8''
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Cesar Ruiz
Miami Dolphins

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.08
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.91
  • Shuttle Time 4.64
  • Vertical Jump 33''
  • Broad Jump 113''
  • Bench Press Reps 28
  • Arm Length 33 1/8''
  • Wingspan 79 5/8''
  • Hand Size 11''
39

Cesar Ruiz

Center

Michigan, junior

  • GMS Games Played 13
  • STRTS Starts 13
  • Sk ALL Sacks Allowed 0
Height/Weight6'3'', 307
Age20
Shades OfErik McCoy

Stout, reliable interior lineman with immense strength, positional versatility, and day-one starting potential.

Main Selling Point: Power and consistency
Scouting Report

Ruiz has a stocky, rotund build with massive, power-generating legs. The Wolverines product plays with strong leverage and a low center of gravity, firing out of his stance to stun defenders, handle them, and seal them away from the play. His playing style and rare power give off the impression that he could hang on the professional sumo-wrestling circuit if he wanted to make a career change.

He’s robotic in a good way with his movements: He’s quick in transitioning from snapping the ball to blocking; he effortlessly moves to the second level when uncovered; and he never panics, playing with a calm helmet, balanced base, and little wasted movement. Ruiz is a consistent pass protector, with just 19 pressures surrendered on 895 snaps over the past two seasons, per Pro Football Focus, and while he’s not the most fleet-footed blocker, he can move people and understands how to wall off opponents to create run lanes. Ruiz also brings versatility to the pros, having made 31 collegiate starts, 26 at center and five at right guard.

Why He Could Rise

Ruiz is tough, physical, and steady; he has plug-and-play potential as a rookie.

Why He Could Fall

He lacks elite foot quickness.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.08
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.91
  • Shuttle Time 4.64
  • Vertical Jump 33''
  • Broad Jump 113''
  • Bench Press Reps 28
  • Arm Length 33 1/8''
  • Wingspan 79 5/8''
  • Hand Size 11''
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Denzel Mims
Houston Texans
(via ARI)

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.38
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 6.66
  • Shuttle Time 4.43
  • Vertical Jump 38.5''
  • Broad Jump 131''
  • Bench Press Reps 16
  • Arm Length 33 7/8''
  • Wingspan 78 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9 3/8''
40

Denzel Mims

Wide Receiver

Baylor, redshirt senior

  • YDS Yards 1020
  • YPR Yards Per Reception 15.5
  • TDS Touchdowns 12
  • REC Receptions 66
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 19
Height/Weight6'3'', 207
Age22
Shades OfDJ Chark

Wiry big-play creator with quick feet, dangerous downfield speed, and a huge catch radius.

Main Selling Point: Above-the-rim playmaking
Scouting Report

Mims is a smooth, cunning pass-catcher with a slender frame, long arms, and top-tier athleticism. He has been one of the biggest risers at the receiver position, starring at the Senior Bowl before blowing the doors off the combine by posting a 4.38-second 40 (which tied for third among WRs) and a 6.66-second three-cone (easily first). Mims combines a Brandon Lloyd–esque penchant for circus catches―his highlight reel of ridiculous grabs is worth a watch, and he notched the second most contested catches (20) in college football last season―with the ability to take the top off the defense on the outside, where he brings strong ball-tracking skills and a knack for drawing pass-interference penalties. Mims lines up all over the formation; he glides off the line of scrimmage, varies his route tempo to lull defenders to sleep, and is dangerous on double-moves, selling fakes with stutter steps and head and shoulder fakes. 

Mims has a well-rounded skill set that combines top-tier body control, concentration, leaping ability, and a natural feel for boxing out defenders. He’s also a good blocker in the run game. He’ll need to refine his route running at the next level, but has the athletic tools to do just that.

Why He Could Rise

Mims boasts top-tier athleticism and an exceptional catch radius; he should be an impact player both on deep shots downfield and in the red zone early in his career.

Why He Could Fall

He has a slight frame, there are some drops on his tape, and he’s still raw as a route runner.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.38
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 6.66
  • Shuttle Time 4.43
  • Vertical Jump 38.5''
  • Broad Jump 131''
  • Bench Press Reps 16
  • Arm Length 33 7/8''
  • Wingspan 78 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9 3/8''
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Brandon Aiyuk
Cleveland Browns

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.50
  • Vertical Jump 40''
  • Broad Jump 128''
  • Bench Press Reps 11
  • Arm Length 33 4/8''
  • Wingspan 80''
  • Hand Size 9 6/8''
41

Brandon Aiyuk

Wide Receiver

Arizona State, senior

  • YDS Yards 1192
  • YPR Yards Per Reception 18.3
  • TDS Touchdowns 8
  • REC Receptions 65
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 17
Height/Weight6'0'', 205
Age21
Shades OfD.J. Moore

Quick-twitch pass catcher with the potential to find pay dirt every time he touches the ball.

Main Selling Point: Big-play talent
Scouting Report

Aiyuk has a tall, well-built frame, absurdly long arms, and a springy lower half. The former junior college transfer is lightning quick at the line of scrimmage, sudden in and out of breaks, and elusive after the catch thanks to his turbo acceleration and ability to change direction without gearing down. He plucks the ball away from his body and brushes off attempted arm tackles like they’re nothing. He’s a big play waiting to happen: He had six 50-plus-yard plays in 2019 (tied for fourth in college football), including three of 70-plus yards (tied for second).

Aiyuk proved to be a threat in the return game, too. He conjures images of Stanford-era Ty Montgomery as a kick and punt returner, averaging 31.9 yards per kick return and 16.1 yards per punt return in 2019. He took a punt to the house against Oregon State and returned a kick 97 yards against USC.

The Sun Devils product was named third-team AP All-American in 2019 after reeling in 65 passes for 1,192 yards and eight scores. He’s raw as a route runner and inconsistent in contested-catch situations, but the upside is unmistakable. His ability to break huge plays should give defenses headaches from the moment he enters the league.

Why He Could Rise

Aiyuk has game-breaking speed with the ball in his hands.

Why He Could Fall

He needs to refine and expand his route tree at the next level, and he had just one season of high-end production at Arizona State.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.50
  • Vertical Jump 40''
  • Broad Jump 128''
  • Bench Press Reps 11
  • Arm Length 33 4/8''
  • Wingspan 80''
  • Hand Size 9 6/8''
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Clyde Edwards-Helaire
Jacksonville Jaguars

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.60
  • Vertical Jump 39.5''
  • Broad Jump 123''
  • Bench Press Reps 15
  • Arm Length 29''
  • Wingspan 70 5/8''
  • Hand Size 9 5/8''
42

Clyde Edwards-Helaire

Running Back

LSU, junior

  • YDS Yards 1414
  • YPC Yards Per Carry 6.6
  • TDS Touchdowns 16
  • REC Receptions 55
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 19
Height/Weight5'7'', 207
Age20
Shades OfMini Maurice Jones-Drew

Short, stocky runner with sweet feet, juke-you-out-of-your-jock lateral quickness, and natural chops in the passing game.

Main Selling Point: Elusiveness
Scouting Report

Edwards-Helaire has a thick, compact build and extremely quick feet. The Tigers standout employs devastatingly effective jump cuts and whirling-dervish spin moves that constantly leave defenders lunging for air. He’s the Ann Veal of 2020 prospects—seemingly nothing can knock him over because he runs with such a low center of gravity. Edwards-Helaire broke 70 tackles on 214 carries last season, gaining 782 yards after contact, according to Pro Football Focus. He finished the campaign with 1,414 rushing yards and 16 touchdowns, adding 55 catches for 453 yards with another score. He also returned kickoffs over his last three seasons on campus, averaging 21.9 yards per return. 

As a player with a three-down skill set, Edwards-Helaire is a dynamic pass catcher out of the backfield; he leaves linebackers flat-footed with sharp angle routes, has proved capable of running vertical routes, and boasts good hands. He can turn a short dump-off into a long gain thanks to his turbo-charged acceleration and uncommon elusiveness after the catch. 

Edwards-Helaire isn’t a push-the-pile type of battering ram; he simply doesn’t have the mass, and that issue can crop up in pass protection, where he’s effective at squaring up blitzers but inconsistent at dropping anchor and holding the rush at bay. CEH brings excellent ball security, though: He had just two fumbles (one lost) on 439 college touches.

Why He Could Rise

Edwards-Helaire brings a true three-down skill set to the NFL. He’s a creative inside runner, has the speed to bounce to the outside, and is an explosive playmaker in the passing attack.

Why He Could Fall

His lack of prototypical size could pigeonhole him into a running-back-by-committee role.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.60
  • Vertical Jump 39.5''
  • Broad Jump 123''
  • Bench Press Reps 15
  • Arm Length 29''
  • Wingspan 70 5/8''
  • Hand Size 9 5/8''
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Terrell Lewis
Chicago Bears
(via LV)

Combine Results

  • Vertical Jump 37''
  • Broad Jump 124''
  • Arm Length 33 7/8''
  • Wingspan 83 3/8''
  • Hand Size 9 7/8''
43

Terrell Lewis

Edge Rusher

Alabama, redshirt junior

  • TKLS Tackles 31
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 11.5
  • Sacks Sacks 6
Height/Weight6'5'', 262
Age21
Shades OfKemoko Turay

Long, bendy edge defender with schematic versatility and intriguing potential—but a lack of experience after suffering season-ending injuries in both 2017 and 2018.

Main Selling Point: Upside, upside, and more upside
Scouting Report

Lewis has an angular, trim build with extremely long levers and a massive 83.5-inch wingspan. The former five-star recruit took a circuitous route to his breakout 2019 campaign for the Crimson Tide, missing 10 games in 2017 with an elbow injury and the entire 2018 campaign with an ACL tear. Yet Lewis played a versatile role for Alabama last season, alternating between a two- and a three-point stance while notching 11.5 tackles for a loss, including 6.0 sacks, and two passes defensed to go with one of the top third- and fourth-down pressure rates in college football (27.6 percent), per Pro Football Focus. His overall pressure rate (19.8 percent) ranked third among edge rushers with 100 or more pass rushing snaps. 

Lewis covers a lot of ground with long strides, boasts plenty of first-step quickness to stress the edge against offensive tackles, and features deadly inside countermoves to beat opponents who overcompensate. He uses a long-armed stab to lift offensive linemen off their feet and into the pocket, and he’s always trying to get his hands into throwing lanes. In coverage, he’s fluid while dropping back and natural while moving around in space.

Why He Could Rise

Lewis has the length and athletic traits to develop into a dominant edge rusher in any scheme.

Why He Could Fall

His injury history and lack of experience are red flags that could give teams pause.

Combine Results

  • Vertical Jump 37''
  • Broad Jump 124''
  • Arm Length 33 7/8''
  • Wingspan 83 3/8''
  • Hand Size 9 7/8''
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Damon Arnette
Indianapolis Colts

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.56
  • Arm Length 30''
  • Wingspan 74 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9 1/8''
44

Damon Arnette

Cornerback

Ohio State, redshirt senior

  • TKLS Tackles 35
  • INTS Interceptions 1
  • PBU Pass Breakups 8
Height/Weight6'0'', 195
Age23
Shades OfMarlon Humphrey

Tough cornerback who makes plays on the ball, knows how to defend the run, and offers schematic versatility.

Main Selling Point: Ball skills, tenacity
Scouting Report

Arnette has a compact, athletic frame and plays with an aggressive, tenacious demeanor. He brings tremendous versatility, with experience lining up on both the inside and outside, in press and off coverage, and in man and zone looks. In press, he utilizes a one-handed jam to disrupt timing and reroute opposing receivers. And when playing in off coverage or zone looks, he scans the field and reads the quarterback’s eyes, using his understanding of route combinations to jump into passing lanes; for example, take his pick-six against Indiana

The Buckeyes defender has a good feel for when to look back and find the ball, and competes all the way through the catch process, swiping and stabbing at the pigskin even after it’s in a receiver’s grasp. He recorded four interceptions and 22 passes defensed in his final three seasons at Ohio State, cementing his reputation as a reliable run defender.

Arnette can get into trouble if he misses on the jam, allowing receivers into his body or letting them get a step on him. He also can be a beat slow when transitioning to his trailing technique.

Why He Could Rise

Arnette is a highly athletic, scheme-versatile corner with excellent ball skills and a fiery style in run support.

Why He Could Fall

He can be tight-hipped in coverage and has shown a lack of discipline at times—he was a penalty machine early in his career before improving in that area in 2019.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.56
  • Arm Length 30''
  • Wingspan 74 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9 1/8''
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A.J. Terrell
Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.42
  • Vertical Jump 34.5''
  • Broad Jump 129''
  • Bench Press Reps 15
  • Arm Length 31 2/8''
  • Wingspan 75 5/8''
  • Hand Size 9''
45

A.J. Terrell

Cornerback

Clemson, junior

  • TKLS Tackles 34
  • INTS Interceptions 2
  • PBU Pass Breakups 4
Height/Weight6'1'', 195
Age21
Shades OfGreedy Williams

Long-limbed corner with quick feet and experience playing multiple coverage techniques.

Main Selling Point: Sticky coverage chops
Scouting Report

Terrell has a sinewy, high-cut frame with extremely long arms. The former five-star recruit uses his length well in all areas: He administers a forceful jam in press looks, grapples with receivers down the field, and gets his hands up to knock the ball away at the catch point. He racked up six interceptions and 13 passes defensed in three seasons at Clemson. For a taller corner, he’s shockingly smooth in transitioning from his backpedal to trailing techniques, and has few issues keeping pace with receivers down the field. He also shows an innate awareness for when to turn his head and play the ball.  

Terrell is a blur as a blitzer off the edge and a strong tackler against the run. He can get grabby late in routes, a habit that could draw flags at the next level. He also has a tendency to cede ground on comeback and hitch routes.

Why He Could Rise

Terrell combines excellent length with lightning-quick feet and top-tier athleticism to consistently keep receivers in his hip pocket.

Why He Could Fall

He lacks the stop-to-start acceleration of smaller corners. NFL decision-makers may also have his national championship game struggles against LSU in mind on draft day.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.42
  • Vertical Jump 34.5''
  • Broad Jump 129''
  • Bench Press Reps 15
  • Arm Length 31 2/8''
  • Wingspan 75 5/8''
  • Hand Size 9''
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Laviska Shenault Jr.
Denver Broncos

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.58
  • Bench Press Reps 17
  • Arm Length 31 7/8''
  • Wingspan 76 2/8''
  • Hand Size 9''
46

Laviska Shenault Jr.

Wide Receiver

Colorado, junior

  • YDS Yards 764
  • YPR Yards Per Reception 13.6
  • TDS Touchdowns 4
  • REC Receptions 56
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 12
Height/Weight6'1'', 227
Age21
Shades OfSupersized Deebo Samuel

Big, extraordinarily physical wideout with the ability to line up all over the formation; has star potential if paired with a creative play-caller.

Main Selling Point: Versatility and power
Scouting Report

Shenault is a dynamic pass catcher whose tall, muscular frame and aggressive, physical style are tailor-made for the NFL. He lined up all over the formation for Colorado, taking snaps out wide, in the slot, and from the wingback, running back, and wildcat quarterback spots. He’s Deebo Samuel with a Mario mushroom power-up. Shenault has easy speed off the line and is capable of threatening defenses vertically and tracking deep throws. He’s dangerous on quick plays, too, as he’s a patient runner who waits for blocks to set up and drifts off the offensive linemen in front of him. He has the kind of acceleration to speed away from defenders when a sliver of daylight appears. 

Shenault packs power in his lower half, breaking 46 combined tackles in the past two seasons, according to Pro Football Focus. That’s top among draft-eligible receivers. He also showcased strength at the catch point for the Buffaloes, like when he stole what should have been a sure interception from the hands of Washington cornerback Trent McDuffie and then shrugged.

As a route runner, Shenault has room to improve. He manhandles smaller corners in press coverage, but can get knocked off his path by bigger, more physical opponents. His route depth and timing are unpredictable at times, and there were a handful of moments in college when he and his quarterback looked out of sync. Durability is a question mark as well: He missed games at Colorado with shoulder and toe injuries, and was diagnosed with pubic bone inflammation in February. Fit is key for Shenault; he could shine on a team that finds creative ways to get him the ball, but may struggle to generate production in a more traditional receiver role.

Why He Could Rise

Shenault has a rare combination of size and explosiveness that makes him a threat to score from anywhere on the field.

Why He Could Fall

He’s raw as a route runner, and his injury history and physical style spark concerns about his durability.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.58
  • Bench Press Reps 17
  • Arm Length 31 7/8''
  • Wingspan 76 2/8''
  • Hand Size 9''
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Michael Pittman Jr.
Atlanta Falcons

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.52
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 6.96
  • Shuttle Time 4.14
  • Vertical Jump 36.5''
  • Broad Jump 121''
  • Bench Press Reps 13
  • Arm Length 32 4/8''
  • Wingspan 79 2/8''
  • Hand Size 9 2/8''
47

Michael Pittman Jr.

Wide Receiver

USC, senior

  • YDS Yards 1275
  • YPR Yards Per Reception 12.6
  • TDS Touchdowns 11
  • REC Receptions 101
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 17
Height/Weight6'4'', 223
Age22
Shades OfAllen Robinson

Big, smooth wideout with great length, play strength, ball-tracking skills, and the ability to line up outside or in the slot.

Main Selling Point: Size, automatic hands
Scouting Report

Pittman is a tall, well-built pass catcher with long arms, a huge catch radius, and soft, reliable hands; he dropped just five passes on 254 college targets. The second-team All-American and Biletnikoff finalist boasts an NFL pedigree―he’s the son of former NFL running back Michael Pittman who played in the NFL for 11 seasons and won a Super Bowl with the Buccaneers―and while he didn’t follow in his father’s footsteps position-wise, the younter Pittman has plenty of running back toughness. He racked up 101 catches for 1,275 yards and 11 touchdowns in 2019 while lining up all over the formation. 

From the outside, Pittman is a dangerous deep threat, combining build-up speed, ball-tracking skills, and catch-point physicality. When aligned in the slot, he’s shown the run-after-the-catch talent to be utilized on screens and quick-game routes, where he’s strong off the line and at his route stem and is capable of breaking tackles in the open field. He’s a core special teams contributor as well, which should give him a good chance to suit up and contribute from day one. He lacks suddenness as a route runner but makes up for it with physicality and a feel for leveraging his size at the catch point. Pittman reminds me of former Spurs star Tim Duncan in that nothing he does is all that flashy or exciting, but he just consistently gets the job done.

Why He Could Rise

Pittman checks a lot of boxes as a tough, smart, and reliable pass-catcher with inside/outside versatility and immediate special teams value.

Why He Could Fall

He lacks the suddenness to create much separation as a route runner and posted just one season of high-end production at USC.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.52
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 6.96
  • Shuttle Time 4.14
  • Vertical Jump 36.5''
  • Broad Jump 121''
  • Bench Press Reps 13
  • Arm Length 32 4/8''
  • Wingspan 79 2/8''
  • Hand Size 9 2/8''
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Cam Akers
New York Jets

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.47
  • Shuttle Time 4.42
  • Vertical Jump 35.5''
  • Broad Jump 122''
  • Bench Press Reps 20
  • Arm Length 30 5/8''
  • Wingspan 74 5/8''
  • Hand Size 9''
48

Cam Akers

Running Back

Florida State, junior

  • YDS Yards 1144
  • YPC Yards Per Carry 5
  • TDS Touchdowns 14
  • REC Receptions 30
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 10
Height/Weight5'10'', 217
Age20
Shades OfAaron Jones

Athletic, rugged runner with scintillating quickness, tackle-breaking talent, and pass-catching chops.

Main Selling Point: Toughness and athleticism
Scouting Report

Akers has a compact, sturdy frame with a thick lower half and electric feet. The former five-star recruit flew under the radar while playing behind a consistently poor offensive line, but showed tackle-breaking prowess, toughness, and creativity as a runner nonetheless. Akers runs with a wide gait, which helps him maintain a low center of gravity, turn on a dime, bound from gap-to-gap, and slash through small openings in the line. Despite being contacted at or behind the line of scrimmage more often than any other FBS back, according to Pro Football Focus, Akers consistently showed that he could make something out of nothing, rushing for 1,144 yards and 14 touchdowns in 2019 while adding 30 receptions for 225 yards and four scores through the air. 

Akers runs behind his pads and is not afraid to take on tackle attempts. He’s deft at deflecting contact, regularly spinning, twirling, and jumping through defenders. He wasn’t used much as a route runner out of the backfield but makes himself available to his QB when things break down, can pick up yards after the catch, and is patient on screens―allowing blockers to seal off defenders before picking his lanes. Akers did a good job of squaring up and stale-mating blitzers in pass protection. He didn’t have many explosive plays in 2019, with just eight rushes of 20-plus yards (which ranked 60th nationally), but he’s a dynamic, complete back who brings three-down starter potential early in his career.

Why He Could Rise

Akers is a physical and elusive ballcarrier with top-tier athleticism and the ability to play on all three downs.

Why He Could Fall

He lacked chunk plays, ball security was an issue at times, and he danced behind the line a little too often instead of just putting his foot in the ground to get downhill.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.47
  • Shuttle Time 4.42
  • Vertical Jump 35.5''
  • Broad Jump 122''
  • Bench Press Reps 20
  • Arm Length 30 5/8''
  • Wingspan 74 5/8''
  • Hand Size 9''
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Ross Blacklock
Pittsburgh Steelers

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.90
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.77
  • Shuttle Time 4.67
  • Vertical Jump 29''
  • Broad Jump 107''
  • Arm Length 32 3/8''
  • Wingspan 78 6/8''
  • Hand Size 9 6/8''
49

Ross Blacklock

Interior Defensive Lineman

TCU, junior

  • TKLS Tackles 40
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 9
  • Sacks Sacks 3.5
Height/Weight6'3'', 290
Age21
Shades OfLong Maurice Hurst

Explosive, gap-shooting defensive tackle with a wrecking-ball mentality. He’s raw, but has all of the necessary traits to develop into a chaos creator.

Main Selling Point: Quick-twitch get-off
Scouting Report

The barrel-chested Blacklock has an imposing frame and long arms. He plays with excellent flexibility and balance, and has unmistakable first-step explosiveness. The TCU star earned freshman All-American honors in 2017 before missing the 2018 season with an Achilles tear. He bounced back by recording 9.0 tackles for a loss, with 3.5 sacks, in 2019. 

He boasts springy athleticism for a big man, uncoiling out of his four-point stance to hit the guy in front of him or bound laterally to attack other gaps on stunts and twists. His hands are a blur, swiping away at blocks to send opposing linemen tumbling off-balance. Blacklock has been known to split double-teams and is generally just a pain in the ass to go against. He’s capable of dropping anchor and taking on blocks and showed the awareness and athleticism to identify and chase down screens. 

There were times when Blacklock appeared slow to react at the snap, and his production didn’t match his physical traits. (He had 5.5 sacks over the last two seasons.) He often leaned on his athleticism to shoot gaps or bull rush opponents, and will need to develop a more nuanced pass rush plan to wear down NFL offensive linemen.

Why He Could Rise

Blacklock has excellent length, top-tier athleticism, and rare first-step explosiveness; he’s seemingly always in the backfield.

Why He Could Fall

His production leaves something to be desired. Teams could also question his durability, given Blacklock’s Achilles injury as a sophomore.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.90
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.77
  • Shuttle Time 4.67
  • Vertical Jump 29''
  • Broad Jump 107''
  • Arm Length 32 3/8''
  • Wingspan 78 6/8''
  • Hand Size 9 6/8''
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Isaiah Wilson
Chicago Bears

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.32
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 8.26
  • Shuttle Time 5.07
  • Vertical Jump 29"
  • Broad Jump 110''
  • Bench Press Reps 26
  • Arm Length 35 4/8''
  • Wingspan 84 3/8''
  • Hand Size 10 2/8''
50

Isaiah Wilson

Tackle

Georgia, redshirt sophomore

  • GMS Games Played 11
  • STRTS Starts 10
  • Sk ALL Sacks Allowed 1
Height/Weight6'6'', 350
Age21
Shades OfD.J. Fluker

Hulking right tackle with people-moving power, incredible length, and projectable athleticism.

Main Selling Point: Moldable traits and rare size
Scouting Report

Wilson boasts a mammoth frame with broad shoulders, a condor-like wingspan, and a powerful lower half. (Oh, and he wears a size-18 shoe.) The former five-star recruit was a three-sport athlete in high school, competing in lacrosse and wrestling while also showcasing rare big-man mobility as a situational, high-stepping, truck-sticking, highlight-making wildcat quarterback. That natural athleticism helped Wilson emerge as a second-team AP All-American in 2019 on the heels of just his second season as a starter at right tackle. Wilson bludgeons rushers with his initial punch, and he can control the snap from start to finish. 

The Georgia product lacks top-tier foot quickness, but his length helps him deal with speed rushers; it simply takes forever to run around him. Wilson looks to dole out punishment in the run game and has bulldozer-like power at the point of attack.  

He occasionally mistimes his punch or misses at the snap, causing him to lunge or bend at the waist while pursuing pass rushers to the edge. Wilson also ends up on the ground too often, and NFL teams will look for him to show better leverage and prevent his weight from falling onto his heels.

Why He Could Rise

Wilson has a combination of size and movement skills that you just can’t coach; he has the traits to develop into a top-tier tackle or a road-grading guard.

Why He Could Fall

He’s heavy-footed at times and he’s still raw, having started just two seasons in college.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.32
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 8.26
  • Shuttle Time 5.07
  • Vertical Jump 29"
  • Broad Jump 110''
  • Bench Press Reps 26
  • Arm Length 35 4/8''
  • Wingspan 84 3/8''
  • Hand Size 10 2/8''
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Prince Tega Wanogho
Dallas Cowboys

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 33 4/8''
  • Wingspan 80 6/8''
  • Hand Size 10 3/8''
51

Prince Tega Wanogho

Tackle

Auburn, redshirt senior

  • GMS Games Played 12
  • STRTS Starts 12
  • Sk ALL Sacks Allowed 0
Height/Weight6'5'', 308
AgeN/A
Shades OfYodny Cajuste

Athletic, easy-moving left tackle with quick feet, excellent hand-fighting skills, and awareness as a blocker—but room to grow as a technician.

Main Selling Point: Blindside-blocking upside
Scouting Report

Wanogho is an athletic, sturdy left tackle prospect with good feet, balance, and a fiery demeanor. The former Tigers standout is still raw―he was a relative newcomer to football after growing up in Nigeria competing in basketball and swimming―and originally committed to Auburn as a four-star defensive end recruit before making the switch to tackle as a freshman. He finished his college career with 32 starts at his converted position. As a pass blocker, Wanogho does well to coordinate his footwork and hand placement to stay centered and balanced against edge rushers. He’s a skilled hand fighter who keeps his strikes inside and varies the use of both hands to keep opponents off-balance and guessing. His basketball background shows up in his instincts to mirror defenders. He shows good awareness to pick up and pass off opponents’ running stunts and line games. Wanagho gave up just 14 pressures in 2019, per Pro Football Focus. 

In the run game, Wanogho has the short-area quickness to pivot and seal out the run lane. He moves like a tight end on arc blocks and while blocking in space, displaying very natural athleticism and body control. He accelerates his feet to generate push on down blocks, but lacks power on downhill looks. He can get a little too aggressive as a run blocker and fall off blocks or get caught lunging. Wanogho primarily played at left tackle at Auburn, but may offer right tackle versatility after lining up on the right side at times in unbalanced line looks.

He projects well in a zone scheme, where his movement skills and foot speed could shine.

Why He Could Rise

Wanogho brings natural athleticism to the left tackle position, with graceful feet and a strong punch in pass protection and the agility to get out and block in space in the run game.

Why He Could Fall

He lacks power as a straightforward blocker and is still raw at the position after taking up football late and then switching to offense as a freshman.

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 33 4/8''
  • Wingspan 80 6/8''
  • Hand Size 10 3/8''
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Bryce Hall
Los Angeles Rams

Combine Results

  • Bench Press Reps 11
  • Arm Length 32 2/8''
  • Wingspan 78 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9 5/8''
52

Bryce Hall

Cornerback

Virginia, senior

  • TKLS Tackles 20
  • INTS Interceptions 0
  • PBU Pass Breakups 4
Height/Weight6'1'', 202
AgeN/A
Shades OfMarcus Peters

Big, long-levered cornerback with excellent instincts and ball skills in coverage.

Main Selling Point: Ball-hawking talent
Scouting Report

Hall is a physical cornerback with long arms and good height. The former high school receiver made the switch to corner as a college freshman and went on to start 39 games for the Cavaliers. He’s a savvy defender who thrives at the catch point; instincts and play recognition are his calling card. He has a knack for deciphering route combinations and reading the quarterback’s eyes, and led all of college football with 21 pass breakups in 2018. He surrendered an opposing passer rating of just 54.5 that season, per Sports Info Solutions. In six games last year, that figure dropped to 50.9. 

He’s comfortable playing off-coverage or half-turn bail technique with his eyes in the backfield, and has the size and strength to play up in press. Hall is physical and aggressive against blocks, is a formidable presence against the run, and has good closing speed as a blitzer off the edge. 

Hall may lack the deep speed and hip fluidity necessary to line up in man-to-man coverage against smaller, shiftier receivers, and he isn’t especially twitchy when changing direction. He’ll likely be limited by scheme, and would fit best in a zone-heavy NFL defense that allows him to play off the line of scrimmage, jump routes, and use his length to press and reroute receivers. An ankle injury cut his 2019 season short, and he missed most of the combine testing while recovering from that injury.

Why He Could Rise

Hall has flashed top-tier coverage instincts and ball-hawking talent; he has the size to body up big receivers on the outside and to be a force in the run game.

Why He Could Fall

He has limitations in man-to-man coverage and lacks elite makeup speed.

Combine Results

  • Bench Press Reps 11
  • Arm Length 32 2/8''
  • Wingspan 78 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9 5/8''
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Zack Moss
Philadelphia Eagles

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.65
  • Shuttle Time 4.37
  • Vertical Jump 33''
  • Bench Press Reps 19
  • Arm Length 31 2/8''
  • Wingspan 75 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9 2/8''
53

Zack Moss

Running Back

Utah, senior

  • YDS Yards 1416
  • YPC Yards Per Carry 6.0
  • TDS Touchdowns 15
  • REC Receptions 28
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 18
Height/Weight5'9'', 223
Age22
Shades OfMarshawn Lynch, David Montgomery

Physical, tone-setting runner with deft footwork, excellent balance, and desirable pass catching chops.

Main Selling Point: Tackle-breaking power
Scouting Report

Moss has a thick, muscular build with a broad upper half and quads that might even impress Saquon Barkley. He’s an aggressive runner with a Beast Mode mentality, treating tackle attempts as personal slights. 

Moss employs a mean stiff arm, has quick feet, and possesses a gyroscope-like ability to absorb tackle attempts, twist his body, and somehow stay upright. He has highlights in which his head and shoulders are facing the sideline and his feet somehow still carry him straight down the field. Moss is not a classic beat-you-around-the-corner-type back, but has good acceleration when he plants his foot and runs north to south. The third-team AP All-American also caught 28 passes for 388 yards with two touchdowns in 2019.

The biggest question surrounding Moss is durability, as his physical brand could cause questions among NFL teams. He missed five games in 2018 due to a meniscus tear, and another three games in 2016―two to a toe injury and a third to an undisclosed injury.

Why He Could Rise

Moss blows through tackle attempts like he’s made of cement; he has the size, power, and quickness to play on all three downs early in his career.

Why He Could Fall

Durability is a question mark, as is fit: He’s best suited for downhill-running teams.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.65
  • Shuttle Time 4.37
  • Vertical Jump 33''
  • Bench Press Reps 19
  • Arm Length 31 2/8''
  • Wingspan 75 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9 2/8''
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Lucas Niang
Buffalo Bills

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 34 2/8''
  • Wingspan 83 1/8''
  • Hand Size 10 4/8''
54

Lucas Niang

Tackle

TCU, senior

  • GMS Games Played 7
  • STRTS Starts 6
  • Sk ALL Sacks Allowed 0
Height/Weight6'6'', 315
Age21
Shades OfCody Ford

Long-limbed right tackle with nimble feet, strong hands, and the movement skills to thrive in a zone scheme―but comes with some injury concerns following hip surgery in 2019.

Main Selling Point: Length and agility
Scouting Report

Niang is a big, athletic right tackle with good height and long, go-go-Gadget arms. The former TCU standout uses that length well, relying on a strong punch to lock out blocks and keep defenders from getting into his body. He’s got a flexible upper half to absorb long-arm stabs and stay with his blocks. He uses his strong hands to ride the bull and maintain his grip against club, pull, and rip moves. In the run game, Niang is an easy mover in space, showing the quickness to reach, pivot, and seal on wide zone or toss plays. He can square up a defender and chop his feet, drive them off the ball, or seal off a run lane. He plays balanced with a wide set and is hard to escape once he locks in. 

As a pass protector, Niang comes off the ball a bit high, and his pass-set footwork can get sloppy and disjointed at times. He’s a smooth operator with very good body control, so it usually worked in college, but he’ll need to play with more refined techniques in the pros. Niang started 27 games for the Horned Frogs; he never allowed more than 14 total pressures in any single season, per PFF, and was called for just three total penalties in his college career. He suffered a hip labrum tear in 2018 and tried to play through the injury as a senior, but elected midway through the 2019 season to have surgery to repair the issue.

Why He Could Rise

Niang brings the combination of size, length, light feet, and athleticism to be an early starter at right tackle.

Why He Could Fall

He’s coming off a hip injury that limited him in 2019 to just seven games and forced him to miss pre-draft events like the Senior Bowl and combine.

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 34 2/8''
  • Wingspan 83 1/8''
  • Hand Size 10 4/8''
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KJ Hamler
Baltimore Ravens
(via ATL via NE)

Combine Results

  • Bench Press Reps 15
  • Arm Length 30 6/8''
  • Wingspan 72 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9 3/8''
55

KJ Hamler

Wide Receiver

Penn State, redshirt sophomore

  • YDS Yards 904
  • YPR Yards Per Reception 16.1
  • TDS Touchdowns 8
  • REC Receptions 56
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 17
Height/Weight5'9'', 178
Age20
Shades OfMarquise Brown

Pint-sized pass catcher with electric speed, jitterbug quickness in and out of breaks, and return-game value.

Main Selling Point: Game-breaking speed
Scouting Report

Hamler may have a slight frame, but that shouldn’t stop him from making an impact at the next level. The Nittany Lions star is remarkably sudden in his movements, using head fakes and shoulder shimmies at the top of his route stem to juke flat-footed defensive backs out of their socks. He has the ability to square defenders up then blow right past them after the catch, and he employs a devastating hesitation step to destroy the pursuit angles of would-be tacklers. Hamler is dangerous on end-arounds and sweeps, and brings value on special teams, as well, averaging 23.5 yards per kick return and 6.0 yards per punt return. 

The Penn State product is efficient at tracking the ball in flight, but must learn to attack the ball at its high point with more consistency. He also struggled with drops in 2019. Still, Hamler has speed that can’t be coached. He can burn past press cornerbacks off the line, and he’ll eat on underneath routes if teams elect to play off him.

Why He Could Rise

Hamler has top-tier deep speed and rare quickness as a route runner.

Why He Could Fall

His tiny frame could cause durability concerns; drops were an issue in 2019, and he may be pigeonholed into a slot role in the NFL.

Combine Results

  • Bench Press Reps 15
  • Arm Length 30 6/8''
  • Wingspan 72 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9 3/8''
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Marlon Davidson
Miami Dolphins
(via NO)

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.04
  • Bench Press Reps 21
  • Arm Length 33''
  • Wingspan 80 4/8''
  • Hand Size 10''
56

Marlon Davidson

Interior Defensive Lineman

Auburn, senior

  • TKLS Tackles 48
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 12.5
  • Sacks Sacks 7.5
Height/Weight6'3'', 303
Age21
Shades OfLamarr Houston

Burly, physical defensive lineman who brings inside/outside flexibility and a tone-setting tenacity to the field.

Main Selling Point: Versatility, raw strength
Scouting Report

Davidson is built like a beer keg with a broad chest, a thick lower half, and long arms. He was a four-year impact player for the Tigers, starting all 51 games he played in, and racked up 7.5 sacks 2019. Davidson offers intriguing schematic versatility―he packs the power (and mass) of a defensive tackle but frequently played as an end at Auburn―and recently told reporters at the combine that his favorite part of football is that he “can literally go out there and hit a man consistently, and pound him, and the police won’t come.” He’s an active, tenacious hand-fighter who never stops attacking and keeps his feet churning. Tight ends and backs can’t block him. He gives full effort chasing plays down the line and in the second level. And he looks to dole out punishment to ball carriers. Davidson brings good lateral quickness and is able to impact the quarterback on stunts and twists, and he blocked three kicks in 2018. 

Davidson offers positional flexibility, but he lacks the quick-twitch explosiveness and bend to consistently threaten the edge in the pros and will be a work in progress as a nickel interior rusher. The former Tiger feased on lesser competition in 2019, but was a standout at the Senior Bowl, regularly blasting past offensive linemen who tried to block him.

Why He Could Rise

Davidson could be deployed all over the line, and he has athletic traits and power to set a strong edge on the outside or bring toughness to the interior.

Why He Could Fall

Some teams may view him as a tweener who lacks the speed and explosiveness to play the end and the size to play the run on the inside.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.04
  • Bench Press Reps 21
  • Arm Length 33''
  • Wingspan 80 4/8''
  • Hand Size 10''
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Noah Igbinoghene
Houston Texans

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.48
  • Vertical Jump 37''
  • Broad Jump 128''
  • Bench Press Reps 15
  • Arm Length 31 6/8''
  • Wingspan 75 1/8''
  • Hand Size 9 3/8''
57

Noah Igbinoghene

Cornerback

Auburn, junior

  • TKLS Tackles 42
  • INTS Interceptions 0
  • PBU Pass Breakups 7
Height/Weight5'10'', 198
Age20
Shades OfAdoree' Jackson

Sticky cover corner with easy speed, lightning-quick feet, and a scrappy, physical style.

Main Selling Point: Athleticism and foot speed
Scouting Report

Igbinoghene has a compact, muscular frame with fluid athleticism and springy agility. A big-time receiver recruit coming out of high school (and the son of a pair of former Olympic track athletes), the Tigers star moved to defense after his freshman season and quickly showed that he could thrive on that side of the ball. Igbinoghene plays with a physical style and tenacious mind-set, always trying to make things as difficult as possible for his opponent. He’s patient in press, clearly confident in his ability to flip his hips and stick close to his assignment in trailing coverage. He also plays with a low center of gravity and strong balance, relying on good knee bend and nimble feet to mirror and chase. 

He shows quick-twitch reaction time to click and close on underneath routes. On deep throws, Igbinoghene has the ability to plant himself into his opponent’s hip pocket. He uses his hands to disrupt timing and knock the ball away at the catch point, and he’s generally a good run defender―even if he must learn to wrap up more consistently. 

Igbinoghene lacks experience at the cornerback position, with just two seasons of starting experience, and that rawness shows up at times. He’s still developing a feel for reading route combinations, playing with proper footwork techniques, and consistently finding the ball in the air. Igbinoghene notched just one interception in his Auburn career (in 2018), but did rack up 18 passes defensed. His lack of length could pigeonhole him into a slot role for some teams, but he has the athletic traits and competitiveness to play outside. He also adds kick return value, with nine returns for 317 yards (35.2 average) and a score on campus.

Why He Could Rise

With outstanding athleticism, top-tier foot quickness, and an aggressive mind-set, Igbinoghene has all the traits necessary to play both on the outside or in the slot.

Why He Could Fall

He lacks length and is still raw in his technique; his low interception total in college could also be a concern.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.48
  • Vertical Jump 37''
  • Broad Jump 128''
  • Bench Press Reps 15
  • Arm Length 31 6/8''
  • Wingspan 75 1/8''
  • Hand Size 9 3/8''
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Antoine Winfield Jr.
Minnesota Vikings

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.45
  • Vertical Jump 36''
  • Broad Jump 124''
  • Arm Length 30 1/8''
  • Wingspan 72 6/8''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
58

Antoine Winfield Jr.

Safety

Minnesota, redshirt sophomore

  • TKLS Tackles 88
  • INTS Interceptions 7
  • PBU Pass Breakups 1
Height/Weight5'9'', 203
Age21
Shades OfXavier Woods

Savvy, physical playmaker who can line up all over the field and always seems to know where the ball is going.

Main Selling Point: Coverage instincts
Scouting Report

Winfield Jr. has a compact, well-built frame and plays with a physicality reminiscent of his three-time Pro Bowler father. He took medical hardship waivers in both the 2017 and 2018 seasons (he missed most of 2017 with a serious hamstring injury and most of 2018 with a ligament tear in his left foot) before returning to put together a standout 2019 campaign, earning first-team AP All-American honors after racking up seven picks, three sacks, 83 tackles, two forced fumbles, and one pass defensed. Splitting time between single-high, two-high, and in-the-box looks, he allowed just nine first downs in primary coverage, according to Pro Football Focus. 

Winfield has a high-level understanding of route concepts, and a natural ability to read the quarterback’s eyes to get a jump on the ball. He’s quick to diagnose whether a play is a run or a pass, and he doesn’t hesitate to fly downfield to lay a big lick. 

The versatile safety lacks explosive, quick-twitch speed, and while he played plenty of single-high looks at Minnesota, he may be at his best in two-high looks in the pros. Those allow him to play downhill and capitalize on his play-recognition talent. He could thrive as a Tyrann Mathieu–esque rover in the secondary, alternating between lurk or robber coverage and man-to-man and zone concepts. Quarterbacks always need to know where Winfield is prior to snapping the ball.

Why He Could Rise

Winfield Jr. brings intensity, play-recognition skills, and hard-hitting tendencies to a defense.

Why He Could Fall

He lacks elite sideline-to-sideline range and missed extensive time in college to injury.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.45
  • Vertical Jump 36''
  • Broad Jump 124''
  • Arm Length 30 1/8''
  • Wingspan 72 6/8''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
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Ashtyn Davis
Seattle Seahawks

Combine Results

  • Bench Press Reps 14
  • Arm Length 30 4/8''
  • Wingspan 75 1/8''
  • Hand Size 9 3/8''
59

Ashtyn Davis

Safety

Cal, senior

  • TKLS Tackles 57
  • INTS Interceptions 2
  • PBU Pass Breakups 4
Height/Weight6'1'', 202
Age23
Shades OfDamarious Randall

Aggressive, versatile safety with turbo-charged acceleration, satellite-dish range, and plenty of pop in his pads.

Main Selling Point: Rare play speed
Scouting Report

Davis is a wiry, athletic safety with good height, short arms, and excellent sideline-to-sideline speed. The Cal product ascended from unheralded walk-on to potential first-round pick in large part because his track background translates to the football field. The first-team All-American hurdler has uncommon range in the back end, as he can hit the turbo boosters and close tons of ground on would-be pass catchers. Davis started his college career as a corner (and some NFL teams may want to use him at that spot) but eventually switched over to safety, operating primarily out of one- and two-high looks. 

He started 33 games for Cal, showing good coverage instincts and reading route combinations to arrive at the intended target. When aligned as a single-high safety, he tallied more combined interceptions and forced incompletions than catches allowed, per PFF. 

Davis doesn’t have the size to play up in the box, but can line up in the slot and has experience on the outside. When aligned deep, he flies downhill and looks to deliver hits, and brings some oomph as a hitter. He can be overaggressive at times, and is still developing a natural feel for the position. Even when he takes steps in the wrong direction, though, he has such incredible speed that he can make up ground on opponents. 

Davis had surgery to repair a groin injury at the end of 2019, forcing him to miss his team’s bowl game and the Senior Bowl. He was a dangerous kick returner early in his career and also brings potential value in that area in the pros.

Why He Could Rise

Davis has speed that can’t be taught―and he’s still just scratching the surface of his potential.

Why He Could Fall

He lacks size and length and can be too bold in pursuit, causing him to overrun plays or miss tackles.

Combine Results

  • Bench Press Reps 14
  • Arm Length 30 4/8''
  • Wingspan 75 1/8''
  • Hand Size 9 3/8''
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Jalen Hurts
Baltimore Ravens

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.59
  • Vertical Jump 35''
  • Broad Jump 125''
  • Arm Length 31 6/8''
  • Wingspan 77 5/8''
  • Hand Size 9 6/8''
60

Jalen Hurts

Quarterback

Oklahoma, senior

  • YDS Yards 3851
  • YPA Yards Per Attempt 11.3
  • TDS Touchdowns 32
  • INTS Interceptions 8
  • RTG Passer Rating 191.2
Height/Weight6'1'', 222
Age21
Shades OfDak Prescott

Playmaking signal-caller with an intriguing combination of arm strength, toughness, and rushing talent―but has issues processing and throwing under pressure.

Main Selling Point: Dual-threat skill set
Scouting Report

Hurts has a compact, well-built frame, a strong arm, and the dynamic athleticism to escape pressure and extend plays or pick up chunk yardage as an option-play ballcarrier. The former Alabama starter led the Crimson Tide to the national championship game in both his freshman and sophomore seasons, but after being replaced by Tua Tagovailoa in the latter title game, he became a backup in 2018. Hurts transferred to Oklahoma for his senior season and put up video-game numbers in Lincoln Riley’s RPO- and play-action-heavy scheme, finishing as a Heisman finalist after throwing for 3,851 yards and 32 touchdowns while adding 1,298 yards and 20 scores on the ground (he even added two catches for 25 yards and a touchdown as a receiver). He ended his college career 38-4 as a starter, displaying both mental and physical toughness and extraordinary leadership traits. 

Hurts showcased improved accuracy and touch in 2019, consistently threading the needle downfield and hitting back-shoulder throws near the sideline. He completed 69.7 percent of his passes and averaged 11.3 yards per attempt―best in the country―and notched a passer rating of 191.2, second only to Joe Burrow. He showed the ability to vary his velocity and throw catchable passes in the intermediate zones, and can hit receivers downfield when on the run. Hurts struggled at times with ball placement on short passes and dump-offs. He is a playmaker out of structure who keeps his eyes downfield after breaking the pocket and always tries to find the open man on the scramble drills, but too often bailed from the pocket at the first hint of pressure. He’s not as explosive or agile a ballcarrier as his predecessor Kyler Murray was, but he’s rugged and tough, with enough speed to pick up chunk yards on the ground and change the math for the offense as a keeper-option in the red zone. Ultimately, Hurts should serve as a Rorschach test for teams: Some will see a quarterback who’s the product of Oklahoma’s wide-open offense, which schemes receivers open downfield, while others will see a dynamic, playmaking passer-slash-runner with star potential in an RPO- and option-run-based offense.

Why He Could Rise

Hurts has a strong arm, a dynamic skill set as a runner, and the ability to escape pressure and keep plays alive. He takes care of the ball―plus, he has the leadership intangibles that every team wants.

Why He Could Fall

His accuracy is inconsistent, he’s too often a beat slow to process, and he looks to leave the pocket in the face of pressure.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.59
  • Vertical Jump 35''
  • Broad Jump 125''
  • Arm Length 31 6/8''
  • Wingspan 77 5/8''
  • Hand Size 9 6/8''
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Jacob Eason
Tennessee Titans

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.89
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.50
  • Shuttle Time 4.75
  • Vertical Jump 27.5''
  • Broad Jump 110''
  • Arm Length 32 7/8''
  • Wingspan 79''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
61

Jacob Eason

Quarterback

Washington, junior

  • YDS Yards 3132
  • YPA Yards Per Attempt 7.7
  • TDS Touchdowns 23
  • INTS Interceptions 8
  • RTG Passer Rating 143.95
Height/Weight6'6'', 231
Age22
Shades OfMatthew Stafford, Dwayne Haskins

Pro-style pocket passer with a prototypical frame and strong, accurate arm—but question marks about his ability to deal with pressure.

Main Selling Point: Size, bazooka arm
Scouting Report

Eason is an exceptionally well-built passer whose top-tier arm strength is sure to captivate the imagination of a handful of teams. The former five-star recruit (who was rated as the no. 2 pro-style QB and one of the top overall players of the 2016 high school class) took a circuitous route through his college career: He started 12 games for Georgia as a freshman but missed time because of a knee injury as a sophomore and failed to win his job back from Jake Fromm. After transferring to Washington and sitting out in 2018, he took the reins for the Huskies last season and completed 64.2 percent of his passes for 3,132 yards, 23 touchdowns, and eight picks while leading the team to an 8-5 record. 

Eason’s arm talent is his defining trait and is what could separate him from the rest of the second- and third-tier passers in this class. The redshirt junior thrives on play-action passes and is capable of effortlessly pushing balls deep down the seam or hitting tight-window deep outs with ease. Even on mid- and short-range throws like quick outs, smoke routes, and slants, Eason can get the ball to his target so quickly that defenders can have a tough time getting an angle to make a play. He can throttle through his pitches, delivering a fast ball on one play before changing it up to a lofted touch pass on the next. Eason brings experience playing both under center and from the shotgun and could be a good fit for a run-heavy, play-action-focused offense in the pros. 

His lack of starting experience showed up in spots, though. His ability to go through progressions and read defensive coverages waxed and waned, and there were a few too many confusing decisions and moments when he appeared to predetermine where the ball was going. Eason is dangerous when he’s kept clean and is allowed to attack defenses from behind the pocket, but his efficiency dropped precipitously when he was pressured or forced to move off his spot.

Why He Could Rise

Eason has all the tools to develop into a good starter in the right system.

Why He Could Fall

He has issues dealing with pressure, is uncomfortable when forced to move off his first read or out of the pocket, and has occasionally suspect decision-making.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.89
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.50
  • Shuttle Time 4.75
  • Vertical Jump 27.5''
  • Broad Jump 110''
  • Arm Length 32 7/8''
  • Wingspan 79''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
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Bryan Edwards
Green Bay Packers

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 32 2/8''
  • Wingspan 78 5/8''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
62

Bryan Edwards

Wide Receiver

South Carolina, senior

  • YDS Yards 816
  • YPR Yards Per Reception 11.5
  • TDS Touchdowns 6
  • REC Receptions 71
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 8
Height/Weight6'3'', 212
Age21
Shades OfJames Jones

Reliable playmaker with a sturdy frame, toughness at the catch point, and quickness off the line of scrimmage and at the top of his route stem.

Main Selling Point: Size and production
Scouting Report

Edwards is a sturdy, athletic wideout with good height, a muscular build, and the ability to line up at multiple spots across a formation. He wasted little time establishing himself as a go-to guy for the Gamecocks, and leaves Columbia as South Carolina’s all-time leading receiver (racking up 234 catches for 3,045 yards with 22 touchdowns) who created plenty of indelible highlights. Edwards boasts the type of physical style you would expect from someone who Clemson once recruited as a safety: He uses his body to box out and overpower smaller corners. 

Edwards has quick footwork at the line of scrimmage and can sink his hips and stop on a dime, making him a tough matchup on both stop and hook routes on the outside. He has good body control, too, occasionally twisting in midair to come down with off-target throws―like this Odell Beckham-esque one-hander near the goal line against Tennessee last season. He’s a strong runner after the catch, and also returned seven punts in 2019, finishing with a 17.9 yard per return average.

Why He Could Rise

Edwards is a savvy pass catcher with the ability to come down with tough catches in traffic; he should contribute early and brings versatility all over the formation.

Why He Could Fall

He isn’t a true high-end burner and has issues with drops.

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 32 2/8''
  • Wingspan 78 5/8''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
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Bradlee Anae
Kansas City Chiefs
(via SF)

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.93
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.44
  • Short Shuttle 4.43
  • Vertical Jump 31''
  • Broad Jump 115''
  • Bench Press Reps 25
  • Arm Length 32 1/8''
  • Wingspan 78 1/8''
  • Hand Size 10 1/8''
63

Bradlee Anae

Edge Rusher

Utah, senior

  • TKLS Tackles 41
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 14
  • Sacks Sacks 13
Height/Weight6'3'', 257
Age21
Shades OfJeremiah Attaochu

Tough, skilled pass rusher with a quick first step, strong hands, and a tenacious demeanor.

Main Selling Point: Nonstop motor
Scouting Report

Anae has a well-built and athletic frame and alternates between rushing from a two- and three-point stance. The third-team AP All-American boasts a quick first step, plays with an always-revved-up motor, and seems to treat every pass-rush rep as an opportunity to express his disdain for his opponent. The Hawaii native was a three-sport star in high school (also excelling in basketball and track) and that athletic versatility shows up in his game: He has very good hands, consistently discarding and deflecting block attempts with chops and push-pull-rip moves, and he uses a strong long-arm stab move to put tackles on their heels. Anae does well to time the snap to get an edge on opposing tackles, and turns the corner on a dime, ducking and flattening to the quarterback without any wasted movement. He’s comfortable dropping back into space. 

Anae notched 13 sacks and a forced fumble in 2019, rarely coming off the field for the Utah defense. He was a team captain who led his team in sacks each of the past three seasons and heads to the NFL as the Utes’ all-time leader in sacks (29.5). He brings the schematic flexibility to be featured as either a standup end in an odd-front scheme or a hand-in-the-dirt pass rusher in an even-front scheme. Anae had a strong week of practice at the Senior Bowl and showed out in the game, with one sack and another hurry that helped create an interception

The former Utah star lacks top-end explosiveness and speed, though, which could limit his upside, and he’s a work in progress as a run defender. He can get moved off his spot in the run game or washed out of the play by bigger linemen. He still needs to refine and further develop his repertoire of pass-rush moves.

Why He Could Rise

Anae brings a resolute intensity that’s contagious to his teammates; he’s relentless on the edge, combining skilled hands, good burst, and enough bend to turn the corner and get to the quarterback.

Why He Could Fall

He lacks length, isn’t the most explosive athlete, and was inconsistent against the run.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.93
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.44
  • Short Shuttle 4.43
  • Vertical Jump 31''
  • Broad Jump 115''
  • Bench Press Reps 25
  • Arm Length 32 1/8''
  • Wingspan 78 1/8''
  • Hand Size 10 1/8''
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Josh Uche
Seattle Seahawks
(via KC)

Combine Results

  • Bench Press Reps 18
  • Arm Length 33 5/8''
  • Wingspan 80''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
64

Josh Uche

Edge Rusher

Michigan, redshirt senior

  • TKLS Tackles 35
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 11.5
  • Sacks Sacks 8.5
Height/Weight6'1'', 245
Age21
Shades OfBruce Irvin

Quick-twitch, hybrid defender who brings the ability to rush the passer and drop back into coverage―but may struggle to carve out a full-time role in the pros.

Main Selling Point: Versatile skill set, athleticism
Scouting Report

Uche is a compact and explosive linebacker–edge rusher hybrid with excellent play speed and the versatility to perform multiple roles for a defense. He rushes from a two-point stance, mixing time between a traditional weakside linebacker spot and up on the line as an edge threat. Explosive traits are his calling card: He brings a quick first step and easy change-of-direction skills, and flashes the ability to convert speed to power. Uche brings an effective long-arm stab, has a forceful initial jolt in his punch, and his first-step burst off the snap can get opposing tackles to cross up their feet. He flashed the ability to dip and rip around the edge, and notched a 27.0 percent pass rush win rate in 2019, second only to Chase Young among draft-eligible edge players, per Pro Football Focus.

Uche likely lacks the size to play a full-time role on the edge, though, and his pass rush can stall if his initial step doesn’t do the job. Tristan Wirfs buried him into the turf on a handful of plays against Iowa last season. He is, however, very dangerous as a blitzer from linebacker spots and has shown the hip fluidity and athleticism to drop back in traditional linebacker coverage roles. He has the awareness to play the run from off-ball looks, but lacks strength and ballast as an edge-setting run defender in the trenches. 

Uche flashed for Michigan as a situational rusher in 2018 and then won a more regular role in 2019, and could follow a similar trajectory in the pros―starting out as a situational nickel rusher who eventually develops into an every-down player that a smart coordinator can deploy all over the formation.

Why He Could Rise

Uche has explosive athleticism and intriguing chess-piece versatility as both a pass rusher and off-ball blitzer.

Why He Could Fall

He’s raw and some teams may view him as a tweener with an undefined position; it may take some time for Uche to find a full-time role in the pros.

Combine Results

  • Bench Press Reps 18
  • Arm Length 33 5/8''
  • Wingspan 80''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
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Austin Jackson

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.07
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.95
  • Vertical Jump 31''
  • Broad Jump 115''
  • Bench Press Reps 27
  • Arm Length 34 1/8''
  • Wingspan 82''
  • Hand Size 10 2/8''
65

Austin Jackson

Tackle

USC, junior

  • GMS Games Played 13
  • STRTS Starts 13
  • Sk ALL Sacks Allowed 4
Height/Weight6'5'', 322
Age20
Shades OfGreg Little

Easy-moving but raw left tackle who boasts intriguing developmental traits―with great size, long arms, and quick feet as a pass blocker; he’ll need to refine his techniques and play with more power.

Main Selling Point: Athletic upside
Scouting Report

Jackson is a former five-star recruit with a stout, well-built frame and long arms. He’s a very athletic mover with great reach, quick feet, and some range to get out and block on outside runs and screens. The former Trojans tackle has good quickness at the snap to get out of his stance and into his pass set, using a strong punch to attack his opponent’s chest and stun him early in his rush. He’s not a road-grader in the run game but plays with some vinegar.

Jackson stops his feet to punch at times, though, and fails to lock on to opposing rushers a little too often, allowing defensive linemen to avoid stalemates and create counterattacks. He needs to get stronger to improve his anchor against power rushers, and can be susceptible to getting pulled off balance with rip moves. He got repeatedly beaten by Iowa’s A.J. Epenesa in their matchup in 2019. He’s still young, though―he won’t turn 21 until a month after the draft―so teams will undoubtedly look at his physical profile and see massive upside. On the personal side, Jackson donated bone marrow to his sister last summer, a procedure that put his football career at risk.

Why He Could Rise

Jackson has the moldable traits teams are looking for at left tackle, with top-tier athleticism, size, and plenty of movement skills.

Why He Could Fall

He’s still developing his techniques and may need a season or two before he’ll be ready to be thrown into the fire.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.07
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.95
  • Vertical Jump 31''
  • Broad Jump 115''
  • Bench Press Reps 27
  • Arm Length 34 1/8''
  • Wingspan 82''
  • Hand Size 10 2/8''
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Cole Kmet

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.70
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.44
  • Shuttle Time 4.41
  • Vertical Jump 37''
  • Broad Jump 123''
  • Arm Length 33''
  • Wingspan 79''
  • Hand Size 10 4/8''
66

Cole Kmet

Tight End

Notre Dame, junior

  • YDS Yards 515
  • YPR Yards Per Reception 12
  • TDS Touchdowns 6
  • REC Receptions 43
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 9
Height/Weight6'6'', 262
Age21
Shades OfJack Doyle

Big, reliable downfield threat with dangerous build-up speed, a massive catch radius, and the mentality to develop as a blocker.

Main Selling Point: Seam-stretching athleticism
Scouting Report

Kmet is a tall, athletic tight end with long arms and a muscular frame that looks capable of adding bulk. He lines up all over the formation, and the first thing that pops off the tape is his impressive and dangerous build-up speed down the seam. 

The former four-star recruit isn’t sudden or explosive in the short area but glides off the line of scrimmage and gives his quarterback a huge target. He’s shown the body control to twist and contort in the air to reel off-target or back-shoulder passes, and has good hands technique to pluck the ball away from his frame. He fights for every yard after the catch and isn’t easy to bring down. 

Kmet pitched for Notre Dame’s baseball team as a freshman before committing fully to football as a junior, and he broke out in 2019, catching 43 passes for 515 yards and six touchdowns after missing the first two games with a broken collarbone. The junior playmaker is still developing his feel and techniques as a blocker―he can get overwhelmed at the point of attack and comes out of his stance a little too high―but he brings a tenacious mentality to the trenches and has the frame to add some weight and improve in that realm. Right now, he’s best as an arc blocker in space or on crack-back-style blocks.

Why He Could Rise

Kmet has the frame and reliable hands to quickly emerge as a security blanket in the underneath area—and boasts the athleticism and body control to develop as a red-zone threat and as a downfield seam stretcher.

Why He Could Fall

He doesn’t yet have the sand-in-his-pants power of a true two-way Y tight end, and his lack of suddenness as a route runner could limit his ability to create one-on-one mismatches.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.70
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.44
  • Shuttle Time 4.41
  • Vertical Jump 37''
  • Broad Jump 123''
  • Arm Length 33''
  • Wingspan 79''
  • Hand Size 10 4/8''
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Darrell Taylor

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 33''
  • Wingspan 80''
  • Hand Size 9 6/8''
67

Darrell Taylor

Edge Rusher

Tennessee, redshirt senior

  • TKLS Tackles 46
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 10
  • Sacks Sacks 8.5
Height/Weight6'4'', 267
Age23
Shades OfMarcus Davenport

Long, burly edge rusher with an impressive first step and an intriguing combination of power and agility.

Main Selling Point: Explosive get-off
Scouting Report

Taylor is a big, muscular edge defender with a thick lower half, long arms, and a scintillating combination of strength and athleticism. The former Volunteer’s best trait might be his explosive first-step burst: He uncoils out of both two- and three-point stances with the speed to consistently threaten the edge or convert his rush to a powerful bull rush. He shows good bend to turn the corner and flatten his rush to get to the quarterback, has mixed in flashes of a burgeoning hump move and long-arm stab, and on counters to the inside, he deploys an effective swim move. He’s inconsistent as a finisher, but has the traits to continue to develop his pass rush. 

As a run defender, Taylor brings size and length and sets a wide, firm base to take on blocks. He has good speed and reactive athleticism to chase down the play from the backside. He locks his arms out to stymie opponents and set the edge but is passive at times in his positioning, allowing offensive linemen or tight ends to dictate the angles and depth of their blocks. He lacked discipline at times. Taylor had some reps carrying running backs into the flats and could develop into an effective interior nickel rusher, showing the juice to rush on the inside or stunt around his teammates to affect the pocket. He notched 8.5 sacks in 2019 and 8.0 sacks the season prior.

Why He Could Rise

Taylor has the skill set to grow into a top-tier edge menace, with a prototypical frame, explosive first-step burst, and a handful of developing pass-rush moves.

Why He Could Fall

He’s still working to turn traits into consistent production, and needs to develop techniques to realize his potential.

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 33''
  • Wingspan 80''
  • Hand Size 9 6/8''
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Jabari Zuniga

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.64
  • Vertical Jump 33''
  • Broad Jump 127''
  • Bench Press Reps 29
  • Arm Length 32 7/8''
  • Wingspan 79''
  • Hand Size 10 3/8''
68

Jabari Zuniga

Edge Rusher

Florida, redshirt senior

  • TKLS Tackles 14
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 7
  • Sacks Sacks 3
Height/Weight6'3'', 264
AgeN/A
Shades OfMatt Judon

Big, twitched up pass rusher with size, speed, and the ability to play at multiple spots on the line―but questions around consistency and a lack of production.

Main Selling Point: Explosive first step
Scouting Report

Zuniga is a thick, muscular pass rusher with a spring-loaded first step, a good bend to dip under blocks and flatten to the quarterback, and incredible closing speed. Zuniga was one of the most athletic edge players at the combine, notching a 4.64 40 (second among all defensive linemen), a 33-inch vert (tied for sixth), and a 10-foot-7-inch broad jump (first) while pushing out 29 reps on the bench (tied for fifth). The Florida product lines up inside and on the edge, is capable of converting speed to power with an aggressive bull rush, and has shown effective push-pull-rip and long-arm stab-rush moves. He’s got hands like granite, stunning defenders with a strong punch and easily shedding block attempts to keep moving upfield. He brings exceptional quickness and power as an interior rusher and is slippery when shooting gaps, capable of getting skinny to scoot through small cracks in the offensive line. Zuniga relies a little too much on his bull rush, but has great upside if he can hone a more diverse set of pass-rush moves.

Zuniga plays with an aggressive, salty demeanor against the run. He ragdolls opponents who try to put hands on him and plays with a wide base to avoid getting washed out of the play. At times, he can lose sight of the quarterback or ball carrier and find himself out of position. He played in just six games in 2019 and a high ankle sprain he suffered in the third game sapped him of some of his effectiveness, but he still managed to generate a 21 percent pass-rush win rate on the year, per Pro Football Focus.

Why He Could Rise

Zuniga has a prototypical frame and extraordinarily explosive traits; he brings the combination of size, speed, and flexibility that every defensive line coach is looking for.

Why He Could Fall

Injuries and inconsistency nagged him at Florida and his production never matched up with his elite physical traits.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.64
  • Vertical Jump 33''
  • Broad Jump 127''
  • Bench Press Reps 29
  • Arm Length 32 7/8''
  • Wingspan 79''
  • Hand Size 10 3/8''
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Julian Okwara

Combine Results

  • Bench Press Reps 27
  • Arm Length 34 3/8''
  • Wingspan 81 6/8''
  • Hand Size 10 2/8''
69

Julian Okwara

Edge Rusher

Notre Dame, senior

  • TKLS Tackles 19
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 7
  • Sacks Sacks 5
Height/Weight6'4'', 252
Age22
Shades OfChristian Miller

Springy edge rusher with good length, top-tier athleticism, and dazzling closing speed―but room to develop a stronger arsenal of pass-rush moves.

Main Selling Point: Pass-rushing upside, closing burst
Scouting Report

Okwara is a stand-up end with a long, athletic frame and a massive wingspan. The younger brother of Lions pass rusher Romeo Okwara, he moved with his family to the United States from Nigeria when he was eight. He lined up on both sides of Notre Dame’s line, showcasing good first-step burst and electric closing speed to track down the quarterback or ball carrier. He plays with very active hands, continually chopping and ripping throughout his rush, and accelerates his feet when contacted. Okwara coordinates footwork and hands to shed blocks and turn the corner simultaneously, and showed the ability to change direction on a dime to flatten his rush and get into the pocket. He adds in a good speed-to-power bull rush that can overwhelm opposing tackles. The former Golden Domer plays with an attitude and notched a pressure rate of 19.1 percent in the past two seasons, per PFF, best among draft-eligible edge players. Okwara notched five sacks and a forced fumble in nine games last year, with three of those sacks coming in one game (Virginia). 

Okwara needs to strengthen his pass-rush plan―he doesn’t consistently string moves together and needs to refine more countermoves to go with his go-to bull rush. He is athletic enough to drop into zones, but he plays high and is not especially strong against the run, and is too frequently getting pushed around at the point of attack. He’s an inconsistent tackler, didn’t finish his rushes at a high enough rate, and his season ended after nine games with a fractured left fibula, which required surgery.

Why He Could Rise

Okwara has the first-step speed and athleticism to develop into a menace on the edge; he’s an ascending talent.

Why He Could Fall

Lacks power against the run, and his sack production didn’t match his traits.

Combine Results

  • Bench Press Reps 27
  • Arm Length 34 3/8''
  • Wingspan 81 6/8''
  • Hand Size 10 2/8''
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Justin Madubuike

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.83
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.37
  • Bench Press Reps 31
  • Arm Length 33 4/8''
  • Wingspan 80 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9''
70

Justin Madubuike

Interior Defensive Lineman

Texas A&M, junior

  • TKLS Tackles 45
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 11.5
  • Sacks Sacks 5.5
Height/Weight6'3'', 293
Age22
Shades OfJarran Reed

Stout, productive interior lineman who stymies blockers in the run game and packs a steamroller-like bull rush as a pass rusher.

Main Selling Point: Power and athleticism
Scouting Report

Madubuike is an undersized defensive tackle with a thick, compact build, tree-trunk legs and long, powerful arms. The former four-star recruit lines up primarily at the 3-technique position but can bounce around all over the line to get after the passer. He broke out for the Aggies in 2018, notching 5.5 sacks and three forced fumbles, and then reprised that performance last season, grabbing another 5.5 more sacks while adding a pick, two pass deflections, and a forced fumble. Madubuike plays with a low center of gravity and has excellent balance to grow roots against double-teams. As a pass rusher, he brings a powerful bull rush, constantly keeping hands and legs churning. He shows awareness to get his hands up into passing lanes, and he’s got the quickness to be effective on stunts and line games. Against the run, he combines squat-rack strength to absorb blocks with a powerful upper half that allows him to grapple and wrestle with opposing blockers. He is vigilant about avoiding cut blocks. 

Madubuike’s lack of size leaves him with a relatively limited tackle-radius and both his motor and snap-timing are inconsistent. He’s quick in the short area but isn’t as explosive as his timed speeds might imply.

Why He Could Rise

Madubuike is an athletic, aggressive interior lineman with the versatility to be deployed up and down the line; he’s going to appeal to teams looking for an early-impact nickel rusher.

Why He Could Fall

His motor ran hot and cold and he may lack the size to play on all three downs.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.83
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.37
  • Bench Press Reps 31
  • Arm Length 33 4/8''
  • Wingspan 80 4/8''
  • Hand Size 9''
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Adam Trautman

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.80
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 6.78
  • Shuttle Time 4.27
  • Vertical Jump 34.5''
  • Broad Jump 114''
  • Bench Press Reps 18
  • Arm Length 32 5/8''
  • Wingspan 78''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
71

Adam Trautman

Tight End

Dayton, redshirt senior

  • YDS Yards 916
  • YPR Yards Per Reception 13.1
  • TDS Touchdowns 14
  • REC Receptions 70
Height/Weight6'5'', 255
AgeN/A
Shades OfAustin Hooper

Big, athletic tight end with intriguing contested-catch prowess and the ability to run routes from all over the formation.

Main Selling Point: Deploy-him-anywhere versatility
Scouting Report

Trautman is big and athletic with a muscular build. He’s a natural, smooth route runner who won first-team FCS All-American honors and was the Pioneer League Offensive Player of the Year in 2019 after reeling in 70 passes for 916 yards and 14 touchdowns. The former high school quarterback and basketball star lines up all over the formation—even out wide in isolation looks—and is a strong, determined runner after the catch who can make defenders miss with both physicality and grace. His basketball background shows up on the field, where he displays good body control and the hops to go up high and reel in 50-50 balls. Trautman was a big-play creator for the Flyers, notching 27 receptions of 15-plus yards, per PFF, best in the FCS at the position, and has reliable hands, with just two drops on 78 catchable targets. He’ll have to prove he can create separation when lined up against pro defenders, but his 6.78-second three-cone-drill time at the NFL combine―the best mark by a tight end since 2003―is a good indicator that his movement skills should translate.

Trautman will need to develop as a blocker at the next level. He didn’t consistently show the ballast and anchor to hold up as an in-line blocker but was effective as a blocker in space, able to square up, lock on, and drive defenders away from the ball on arc blocks. He positions himself well to seal defenders on the backside of plays.

Why He Could Rise

Trautman brings intriguing traits as a mismatch-creating move tight end; he’s big, athletic, and competitive with the ball in the air, and fearless going up to catch the ball in traffic.

Why He Could Fall

He dominated at a lower level of competition, and while Trautman is quick he lacks top-end straight-line speed.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.80
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 6.78
  • Shuttle Time 4.27
  • Vertical Jump 34.5''
  • Broad Jump 114''
  • Bench Press Reps 18
  • Arm Length 32 5/8''
  • Wingspan 78''
  • Hand Size 9 4/8''
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Raekwon Davis

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.12
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.95
  • Shuttle Time 4.86
  • Vertical Jump 28''
  • Broad Jump 111''
  • Bench Press Reps 24
  • Arm Length 33 7/8''
  • Wingspan 85 2/8''
  • Hand Size 11''
72

Raekwon Davis

Interior Defensive Lineman

Alabama, senior

  • TKLS Tackles 47
  • TFL Tackles For Loss 3
  • Sacks Sacks 0.5
Height/Weight6'6'', 311
Age22
Shades OfStephon Tuitt

Brawny, long-limbed defensive lineman with heavy hands, immense strength, and a heavy anchor who needs to unlock his pass-rush potential.

Main Selling Point: Rare length and power
Scouting Report

Davis is big, burly, long, and strong. He boasts a massive frame with thick legs, a beefed-up torso, and anvils for hands. The former Crimson Tide stalwart is a three-year starter with 48 games on his resume. He lines up all over the line and is capable of setting a mean, solid edge or generating push from the inside. Davis plays with very good leverage despite his height, firing out of his stance with good lean and lead-fist punches to stun and control his opponent. He’s flashed a good push-pull-rip to get offensive linemen lunging and is as strong as an ox at the point of attack. He drops anchor against double teams and shows good awareness to maintain his gap(s) and keep his eye on the quarterback or the ball (he had a pick on a deflected pass against Georgia in the 2017 national championship). Davis’s floor is that of a dominant run defender who can contribute at multiple spots on the line. 

But while he’s a good athlete, Davis has struggled to match his pass-rush production from a breakout campaign in 2017, when he tallied 8.5 sacks in 2017. He grabbed just 1.5 sacks in 2018 and a half-sack last season. He lacks twitchy movement skills and a well-developed pass-rush repertoire, and if he gets stonewalled on his first step he isn’t consistently capable of mounting a counterattack. There are times when he gets out over his skis as a rusher and that can make him too easy to handle. He’s a consistent pocket disruptor but lacks closing burst and agility to finish his rush. If Davis can unlock his pass-rush potential and develop a bigger repertoire of moves, he brings the type of scintillating upside that could be worth a first-round pick.

Why He Could Rise

Davis boasts rare length, Paul Bunyan strength, and pocket-pushing talent; he’ll be an impact defender against the run from day one and boasts intriguing pass-rush upside.

Why He Could Fall

His sack totals dropped in both of the past two years, and some teams may see him as only an early-down run-stuffer. An ankle injury also hindered him in 2019 and he missed the Senior Bowl because of that injury.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.12
  • 3-Cone Drill Time 7.95
  • Shuttle Time 4.86
  • Vertical Jump 28''
  • Broad Jump 111''
  • Bench Press Reps 24
  • Arm Length 33 7/8''
  • Wingspan 85 2/8''
  • Hand Size 11''
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Tyler Johnson

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 30 7/8''
  • Wingspan 75''
  • Hand Size 9''
73

Tyler Johnson

Wide Receiver

Minnesota, senior

  • YDS Yards 1318
  • YPR Yards Per Reception 15.3
  • TDS Touchdowns 13
  • REC Receptions 86
  • 20+ 20-plus Yard Plays 19
Height/Weight6'1'', 206
Age21
Shades OfTyler Boyd

Tough, crafty pass-catcher who thrives above the rim; lacks elite speed and suddenness but wins with good routes and excellent body control.

Main Selling Point: Catch-point prowess
Scouting Report

Johnson is a tall, well-proportioned wideout who’s tough as hell over the middle and draws on his huge catch radius and play strength to dominate 50-50 balls. The former Minnesota star was wildly productive in college, reeling in 164 passes for 2,487 yards and 25 touchdowns over his past two seasons with the Gophers. Johnson lined up primarily in the slot, where he tracked the ball beautifully on slot fades and was fearless in going up over the middle and exposing his ribs, knowing he was gonna get thwacked. He lacks suddenness as a route runner but has a natural feel for leverage to get defenders on his hip and box them out away from the ball. He’s dangerous as a runner after the catch and was a reliable go-to guy in the red zone for Minnesota. His highlight tape is littered with “holy shit” moments. 

Johnson struggled with drops in 2018 but improved in that area last season. He lacked urgency in his routes at times, and his lack of top-end speed and quickness may limit his utility as an outside receiver in the pros. He projects well as a big slot target, and brings the upside to become a go-to guy on third downs and in the red zone.

Why He Could Rise

Johnson is the definition of a playmaker, a wildly productive pass-catcher who thrives in the slot and in the red zone and has a knack for the impossible catch.

Why He Could Fall

He may lack the top-end speed and short-area quickness to separate at the next level, and drops have been a glaring issue at times.

Combine Results

  • Arm Length 30 7/8''
  • Wingspan 75''
  • Hand Size 9''
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Damien Lewis

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.24
  • Vertical Jump 30''
  • Broad Jump 108''
  • Bench Press Reps 27
  • Arm Length 33''
  • Wingspan 79 4/8''
  • Hand Size 10 2/8''
74

Damien Lewis

Guard

LSU, senior

  • GMS Games Played 15
  • STRTS Starts 15
  • Sk ALL Sacks Allowed 4
Height/Weight6'2'', 327
AgeN/A
Shades OfQuinton Spain

Big bowling ball of a blocker who plays with excellent strength and leverage in the run game and excels in a phone booth.

Main Selling Point: Bulldozer power
Scouting Report

Lewis is a powerful, big-boned guard with a square build and long arms. The JUCO transfer and LSU standout plays with tenacity in the run game and consistently looks to bury opponents into the turf. He’s an aggressive run blocker who fires out of his stance, overwhelms defensive linemen with superior leverage, and controls them with upper-body torque. He grapples with second-level defenders, showing the ability to uproot and seal off defenders. 

Lewis is not as consistent as a pass blocker. He lacks foot speed and recovery agility to play in space. His hands come up too early, allowing pass rushers to bat them away easily, and he takes on incoming blitzers too high, at times getting knocked back into the pocket. He does best when he plays in a phone booth with his cohorts on both sides, showing a good solid base and a flexible upper body to bend, stay connected, reset his feet, and stymie bullrushes. Lewis played right guard in 2019, and though he took snaps at center at the Senior Bowl, he doesn’t yet offer much positional versatility and is not likely a great fit in a wide zone scheme that gets him moving down the line or in space. He’s best suited for gap and downhill schemes where his power can be utilized.

Why He Could Rise

Lewis is a mauler on the interior, capable of uprooting defenders at the point of attack, creating run lanes, and growing roots against both power-based and more explosive interior rushers.

Why He Could Fall

He lacks footspeed to play in space, and may not offer much schematic or positional versatility.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 5.24
  • Vertical Jump 30''
  • Broad Jump 108''
  • Bench Press Reps 27
  • Arm Length 33''
  • Wingspan 79 4/8''
  • Hand Size 10 2/8''
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Kyle Dugger

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.49
  • Vertical Jump 42''
  • Broad Jump 134''
  • Bench Press Reps 17
  • Arm Length 32 7/8''
  • Wingspan 78 4/8''
  • Hand Size 10 3/8''
75

Kyle Dugger

Safety

Lenoir-Rhyne, senior

  • TKLS Tackles 31
  • INTS Interceptions 2
  • PBU Pass Breakups 6
Height/Weight6'1'', 217
Age24
Shades OfShaq Thompson

Explosive, rangy safety with size, speed, and a hard-hitting style―but question marks surrounding his level of competition.

Main Selling Point: Elite athletic traits
Scouting Report

Dugger has a strong, tapered frame with long arms and a muscular lower half. He’s also a loose, fluid athlete with top-end speed and elite leaping ability. He absolutely blew up at February’s combine, running a 4.49-second 40-yard dash (sixth among safeties) while jumping 42 inches in the vertical (first) and 11 feet, two inches in the broad jump (second). 

The small-school standout played primarily in two-high looks in college, showing the hip fluidity to come up to cover in the slot and the physicality to excel in the box. He loves to play with his eyes in the backfield, and is an eager downhill defender with a massive tackle radius. With long arms, big hands, and quick-twitch reactive athleticism, Dugger showed the ability to finish plays even when he appeared to have overrun a ballcarrier or taken a bad angle. He also adds potential value on special teams, returning two punts for touchdowns in 2019. 

While Dugger certainly looked like he belonged in the NFL at Senior Bowl practices, his experience against Division II competition makes him a tough player to evaluate. He’s not especially young, either; he’ll be a 24-year-old rookie after redshirting as a freshman and taking a medical redshirt year in 2016. His backside pursuit and urgency on plays away from him comes and goes. Overall, though, Dugger brings versatility to line up in multiple roles in the secondary, and could even play as a de facto linebacker in the pros.

Why He Could Rise

Dugger has all the traits to develop into a top-tier defensive playmaker who can be deployed in multiple roles.

Why He Could Fall

The projection from Division II star to NFL standout is a tough one, as concerns about his level of competition could deter some teams.

Combine Results

  • 40-Yard Dash Time 4.49
  • Vertical Jump 42''
  • Broad Jump 134''
  • Bench Press Reps 17
  • Arm Length 32 7/8''
  • Wingspan 78 4/8''
  • Hand Size 10 3/8''
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Measurement data and player statistics via cfbstats.com, school bios, and the NFL combine.