The Ringer's 2020 NFL
Draft Guide

With scouting reports by Danny Kelly

Updated 1.21
No Credits

Welcome to The Ringer’s 2020 NFL Draft Guide. Consider this your one-stop shop for all things draft-related leading up to the first round on April 23. It’ll include Danny Kelly’s Big Board rankings, scouting reports, mock drafts, and much more—and we’ll be updating it regularly to account for the latest news and developments. This has all of the prospect analysis you need, whether you’re a fan or an executive determining the future of one of the NFL’s 32 franchises.

At launch, the guide features the Big Board, highlighting the 32 players Kelly is highest on coming out of the college football season. That list will soon expand, and in February we’ll roll out the first of many mock drafts. Following free agency, we’ll introduce a team needs section that makes sense of each roster’s biggest holes. And we’ll be adding a lot more goodies, too. Bookmark this now and return often.

Make sure to click through to check out the guide’s full suite of offerings, from our sort-by-position tool to our in-depth player cards. As people rise and fall, you’ll be able to keep track of the chaos here.

Draft season is upon us. From Chase Young to Joe Burrow to Tua Tagovailoa and beyond, the fun starts now.

   
Big Board by Danny Kelly Updated 1.21
Mock Draft Coming in February
Team Needs Coming in March
Arizona Cardinals
Arizona Cardinals
Chase Young
Buffalo Bills
1

Chase Young

Edge Rusher

Ohio State, junior

  • TKLS 46
  • TFL 21
  • Sacks 16.5
Height/Weight6'5'', 266
Age20
Shades OfJadeveon Clowney

Dominant edge rusher with a rare combination of explosiveness, power, technique, and versatility

Main Selling Point: Game-wrecking pass-rush talent
Scouting Report

Young is an explosive pass rusher with a thick, muscular lower half and long, powerful arms. He boasts the type of mass, length, and athleticism to make impact plays all across the line―or even as a stand-up defender capable of dropping back into coverage. Young is at his best going forward, though, where he can use his elite get-off and extraordinary explosiveness as the foundations of his rush: He uncoils upfield with drag-racer acceleration to quickly get a step on opposing linemen and put them on their heels. From there, Young alternates between bending around the corner, using a countermove back inside, or going straight through his opponent with bulldozer-like power. The Heisman finalist has a well-rounded repertoire of pass-rush moves, using the side scissors, double scissors, and inside side scissors rush techniques to swipe away opponents’ hands and keep them lunging. He’s rarely stalemated at any point in his rush. 

Over the past two seasons, Young has posted absolutely bonkers statistical numbers, racking up a combined 27 sacks, 35.5 tackles for a loss, eight pass deflections, and eight forced fumbles in 25 games. His 16.5 sacks in 2019 set the new single-season Buckeyes record.

Why He Could Rise

Young boasts size, explosiveness, elite numbers, and a well-developed arsenal of pass rush techniques.

Why He Could Fall

Teams may balk at the fact he didn’t record a sack in his last three games at Ohio State. Hey, we had to put something here.

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San Francisco 49ers
San Francisco 49ers
Joe Burrow
Buffalo Bills
2

Joe Burrow

Quarterback

LSU, redshirt senior

  • YDS 5671
  • YPA 10.8
  • TDS 60
  • INTS 6
  • RTG 202.0
Height/Weight6'3'', 215
Age23
Shades OfSlim Andrew Luck

Hyperefficient signal-caller with top-tier accuracy, ice in his veins even under pressure, and some out-of-structure playmaking moxie―but just one season of elite production

Main Selling Point: Pinpoint accuracy, unshakable poise
Scouting Report

Burrow’s meteoric rise from middling QB afterthought to bona fide star in the Tigers’ new-look spread offense has been the defining story of the college football season. With an aggressive, attacking style and top-tier accuracy, Burrow repeatedly carved up the best defenses in college football, winning the Heisman Trophy and leading LSU to a national championship while putting together perhaps the best single-season passing performance in college football history, connecting on 76.3 percent of his passes for 5,671 yards, 60 touchdowns, and just six picks.

Burrow has a slender frame and lacks elite arm strength, but he separates himself with incredible accuracy, unshakeable composure under pressure, and the athleticism to extend plays or pick up yards with his feet. The former Ohio State transfer has the natural ability to navigate the pocket and escape pressure; he keeps both hands on the ball to avoid fumbles and can strafe, spin, duck, dive, and dodge his way out of trouble while keeping his eyes downfield. He keeps his balance when throwing on the run, and has shown the ability to twist his torso to generate torque on cross-body throws. The LSU star brings a scintillating combination of aggressiveness, strong decision-making, and pinpoint ball placement; per Pro Football Focus, Burrow tallied 32 big-time throws (a college football best) but just nine turnover-worthy plays during the regular season, grading out tops among all quarterbacks both under pressure and on tight-window passes. The fearless demeanor he showed in the biggest moments in 2019 invites Tom Brady comparisons.

Why He Could Rise

Burrow is the complete package at quarterback, boasting elite accuracy, playmaking talent, and leadership skills. He’s a near-lock to go no. 1.

Why He Could Fall

He won’t fall, but there could be concern around his massive jump in production in 2019, which came in LSU’s new shotgun-spread, RPO-heavy offense. His slender frame and aggressive running style could make him an injury risk at the next level.

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New York Jets
New York Jets
Tua Tagovailoa
Buffalo Bills
3

Tua Tagovailoa

Quarterback

Alabama, junior

  • YDS 2840
  • YPA 11.3
  • TDS 33
  • INTS 3
  • RTG 206.9
Height/Weight6'1'', 232
Age21
Shades OfSouthpaw Drew Brees

Dynamic, playmaking lefty with a quick-fire release and consistently perfect ball placement. Durability is the biggest question mark.

Main Selling Point: Processing speed, accuracy
Scouting Report

Tagovailoa will be one of the draft’s biggest X factors. When healthy, the Crimson Tide signal-caller boasts the processing speed, pocket presence, accuracy, and overall playmaking set to be a star at the next level. But the devastating hip injury he suffered in November could be a deal breaker for some teams. His medical checks leading up to April’s draft will determine just how high he’ll go.

Based purely on talent, though, Tua is the total package. The 6-foot-1, 232-pound dynamo leaves Alabama with the most statistically impressive passing career in college football history, finishing with the highest passer-efficiency rating (199.4) and yards-per-attempt average (10.9) ever to go with 87 touchdowns and just 11 picks. His 12.7 percent touchdown percentage ranks first in Division I history… by more than 2 percentage points. He’s a quick decision-maker, reading coverages almost instantly while decisively attacking downfield. He pairs those critical mental attributes with a tight, compact throwing motion that helps him put the right amount of touch on his passes at all three levels. Tagovailoa has an expert feel for the pocket, stepping up or away from pressure while keeping a balanced base and his eyes downfield. The junior quarterback doesn’t have a rocket arm, but the ball jumps off his hands; he can hit deep outs with plenty of velocity and he throws a pretty deep ball. In the short and intermediate areas, he leads his receivers away from big hits or hits them perfectly in stride so they turn upfield and pick up extra yards. Tagovailoa can pick up yards with his legs too; he rushed for 340 yards and nine touchdowns in his career. As far as intangibles go, Tua showcased incredible poise, toughness, and leadership in his three seasons at Alabama.

Tagovailoa gets in trouble when he tries to do too much, and that’s led to some turnovers. He’s gotten tunnel vision while moving through his progressions on a few occasions and has tried to force a few ill-advised passes off his back foot and into double coverage. Tagovailoa is a bit undersized by traditional standards, and the durability question is a big one: In addition to the hip injury, Tua has suffered high ankle sprains in each of the past two seasons (his left in 2018, his right this season), both necessitating a TightRope procedure to correct the issue.

Why He Could Rise

Tagovailoa is a decisive, accurate, and dynamic playmaker with all the intangibles of a franchise player. He also made one of the greatest throws in college football history.

Why He Could Fall

Tua’s hip injury could take him completely off some team’s boards. There could also be some concerns that his numbers were inflated by Alabama’s elite surrounding talent.

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Oakland Raiders
Oakland Raiders
Isaiah Simmons
Buffalo Bills
4

Isaiah Simmons

Linebacker

Clemson, redshirt junior

  • TKLS 102
  • TFL 16
  • Sacks 8
Height/Weight6'3'', 228
Age21
Shades OfMega Derwin James

The archetype of a modern positionless defender; a monumentally versatile athlete with size, length, physicality, and coverage chops to play anywhere in the back seven

Main Selling Point: Infinite versatility
Scouting Report

Simmons is listed as a linebacker here, but really he’s just a damn good football player, regularly shifting between linebacker, safety, edge rusher, nickelback, and cornerback alignments. At 6-foot-3 and 228 pounds with incredibly long arms, Simmons is a uniquely built and extraordinary athlete―he’s a former state champion long jumper with explosive hops, turbo acceleration, and high-end speed―allowing him to range sideline to sideline, blitz, or cover in the back end with equal aplomb. The Tigers star is a ferocious tackler who enthusiastically fills gaps seeking contact. He’s instinctive; he trusts his eyes and always seems to know where the ball is going. He can flip his hips and run with receivers, and knows how to turn back and look for the ball in coverage. He’s one of the few defenders who made the 2019 LSU offense sweat. 

The junior playmaker filled up just about every category on the stat sheet this year, racking up 104 tackles―16.5 going for a loss―with 8.0 sacks, three picks, eight pass deflections, and two forced fumbles. He has All-Pro potential early in his career.

Why He Could Rise

Simmons is an instinctive and uber-athletic plug-and-play starter who can come up into the box, play the slot, or patrol deep; the sky's the limit for how a creative coordinator could deploy him.

Why He Could Fall

Some teams may see him as a tweener without a position.

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Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Jeff Okudah
Buffalo Bills
5

Jeff Okudah

Cornerback

Ohio State, junior

  • TKLS 35
  • INTS 3
  • PBU 9
Height/Weight6'1'', 200
Age20
Shades OfMarshon Lattimore

Shutdown cornerback with prototypical size, electric feet, top-tier speed, and innate instincts; should be a day-one starter

Main Selling Point: Total-package skill set
Scouting Report

Okudah is an extraordinarily explosive athlete with quick feet, terrific speed, and jump-out-of-the-gym hops. The former five-star recruit and first-team All-American has excellent size and plays aggressively in press coverage, showing exceptional makeup speed to recover if he takes false steps or misses on his jam. He’s sticky in man-to-man looks. He’s patient, balanced, and methodical in bail or half-turn coverage, getting low into his stance to dissect the scheme and then flipping his hips to run with opposing receivers with ease. And he’s shown the ability to reel in interceptions while lying flat on his back. He’s a big-time playmaker ... even if he doesn’t always get the call when he forces a critical fumble.

Okudah notched three picks and broke up another nine passes this season, quieting concerns about a lack of ball-hawking skills. (He had zero interceptions playing a rotational role in his first two seasons.) Still, he needs to continue to improve at getting his head around to find the ball at the catch point. He may need to play stronger in the pros, because while he delivers some pop in run support, his tenacity in that area fluctuates.

Why He Could Rise

Okudah is a top-flight man-cover corner with the awareness and athleticism to play in multiple schemes and techniques. He has the talent to become one of the league’s next great shutdown corners.

Why He Could Fall

He started only one full season and is still inconsistent at the catch point.

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New York Giants
New York Giants
Tristan Wirfs
Buffalo Bills
6

Tristan Wirfs

Tackle

Iowa, junior

  • GMS 13
  • STRTS 13
  • Sk ALL 2
Height/Weight6'5'', 320
Age20
Shades OfTrent Williams

Agile blocker with massive size, smooth athleticism, and immense strength; mirrors in pass protection and moves people in the ground game

Main Selling Point: Outstanding power and athleticism
Scouting Report

Wirfs is a mountain of a man: He has tree trunks for legs, a beer keg for a torso, and pythons for arms. The Hawkeyes right tackle―a state champion high school wrestler and discus thrower (of course!) who set an Iowa record by power-cleaning 450 pounds―created plenty of movement in the team’s pro-style run game and showed surprising movement skills as a pass protector, too. He glides into his pass set with light feet and a balanced base. Wirfs has incredible upper-body strength to latch on to and control opponents; he also possesses good recovery skills, as he’s able to quickly gather his feet and re-anchor even when he’s knocked back at the snap. He allowed just 40 quarterback pressures on 1,138 career pass-block snaps, per Pro Football Focus

There are times when Wirfs can miss with his punch in the run game or get caught lunging forward in pass protection, though. In those cases, he’ll drop his head and shoulders and allow defenders to swim past him. He’s also inconsistent targeting blocks at the second level, but has the athletic traits to improve in that area.

Why He Could Rise

Wirfs is big, physical, and extremely athletic; he plays with light feet and strong hands in pass protection and incredible power in the run game.

Why He Could Fall

He can get out over his skis at times and fall off of blocks. And while he’s generally projected as a left tackle after playing on the right side at Iowa, some teams may view him as a future guard.

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Jacksonville Jaguars
Jacksonville Jaguars
Derrick Brown
Buffalo Bills
7

Derrick Brown

Interior Defensive Lineman

Auburn, senior

  • TKLS 55
  • TFL 12.5
  • Sacks 4
Height/Weight6'4'', 325
Age21
Shades OfAkiem Hicks, Fletcher Cox

Extraordinarily strong interior lineman who dominates against the run and can create havoc in the pocket

Main Selling Point: Pocket-smashing power
Scouting Report

Brown is built like a brick shit-house, with a massive chest, extremely long arms, and a powerful lower half that combine to create a game-wrecking interior presence. He’s a former five-star recruit and physical marvel with a motor that always runs hot, and is equally devastating playing the run as he is smashing through offensive lines and into the pocket. The Auburn star didn’t miss a tackle all year and was damn near unblockable as a pass rusher, with an explosive first step and bulldozer power to put opposing linemen on skates. He strikes with heavy hands and stuns opponents, using effective spin and swim moves to send offensive linemen lunging for air. He can quickly bound from gap to gap and has the ability to anchor against double-teams. 

Brown has the versatility to line up at nose tackle, at the three-technique spot, or even outside at times. He’s on the ground a bit more than you’d like, but he has the athleticism and power to impact both the run and pass game for a defense.

Why He Could Rise

Brown is a game-wrecking three-down lineman who can stop the run and make opposing quarterbacks’ lives miserable.

Why He Could Fall

He can get knocked off balance when firing out of his stance, and he’ll lose track of the ball from time to time; could be susceptible to trap and wham blocks that take advantage of his aggressive style.

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Detroit Lions
Detroit Lions
CeeDee Lamb
Buffalo Bills
8

CeeDee Lamb

Wide Receiver

Oklahoma, junior

  • YDS 1327
  • YPR 21.4
  • TDS 14
  • REC 62
  • 20+ 27
Height/Weight6'2'', 192
Age20
Shades OfSlim DeAndre Hopkins

Silky-smooth route-runner who’s savvy at the catch point and rugged and slippery  after the catch, the definition of a playmaker

Main Selling Point: Big-play prowess, elusiveness
Scouting Report

Lamb is a dynamic and versatile pass-catcher with sinewy strength that belies his slender frame. The Biletnikoff finalist uses his quickness and turbo acceleration to get off the line of scrimmage and glide into his route stem before cutting sharply to create separation. On deeper routes, he lacks elite speed but is still dangerous thanks to his mastery at both tracking the ball in flight and dominating at the catch point. Using subtle tugs and push-offs to establish position get defenders off-balance, Lamb uses his length, strong hands, and unflinching focus to turn 50-50 balls into much higher-probability propositions. 

The first-team AP All-American caught 62 passes for 1,327 yards and 14 touchdowns (fifth most nationwide) in 2019 and totaled 173 receptions for 3,292 yards and 33 total touchdowns in three seasons in Norman. He averaged an absurd 19.0 yards per catch in his college career, including a 21.4-yard average in 2019—good for third among FBS players. Lamb is a big play waiting to happen, capable of taking the top off a defense or taking a quick slant or screen and turning it into a jail-break score. He’s extremely dangerous after the catch, using deft footwork to slalom through the defense; just ask Texas about that. There are moments in which he almost looks like a taller, lankier version of Alvin Kamara in the way he deflects contact, slips through tackle attempts, and explodes into the open field.

Why He Could Rise

Lamb has length, quickness, strong hands, and incredible run-after-the-catch talent; he’s a field-tilting presence who’s a threat to score on every play.

Why He Could Fall

He doesn’t always show a sense of urgency when the ball goes away from him, he has a slender frame, and he may lack the extra gear necessary to run away from NFL defenders.

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Buffalo Bills
Buffalo Bills
Javon Kinlaw
Buffalo Bills
9

Javon Kinlaw

Interior Defensive Lineman

South Carolina, senior

  • TKLS 35
  • TFL 6
  • Sacks 6
Height/Weight6'6'', 310
Age22
Shades OfChris Jones

Versatile defensive lineman with excellent length, strength, and get-off; consistently creates havoc in the backfield no matter where he lines up

Main Selling Point: Pocket-disrupting power
Scouting Report

Kinlaw has a sturdy base, a muscled upper body, and long, vine-like arms. The first-team AP All-American is a disruptive, penetrating interior defender with an explosive first step who packs a heavy punch that visibly shocks offensive linemen. Kinlaw has racked up 16 tackles for loss, including 10.5 sacks, to go with seven pass deflections over the past two seasons, but those numbers belie his true impact. He’s always a factor, knifing through the line or pushing the pocket to disrupt a quarterback’s dropback or a running back’s lane. 

The senior defensive lineman was a team captain and was honored by teammates with the Tenacity Award (among a handful of other honors), a testament to his ability to keep his hands moving and feet churning even when his first step doesn’t work. Kinlaw can set up at multiple spots along the line and excels behind a solid club-rip move and an effective swim move. He boasts good balance for a big man, showing awareness to avoid cut blocks and stay on his feet. He’s a strong run defender but needs to be more consistent playing with leverage at the point of attack.

Why He Could Rise

Kinlaw is a long, versatile disruptor with a rare combination of power and athleticism; he can use his quickness to shoot gaps and his strength to overpower the lineman in front of him.

Why He Could Fall

He loses ground against double-teams and sometimes gets washed out of the play; he’ll occasionally overrun the action or lose track of the ballcarrier.

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Denver Broncos
Denver Broncos
Jedrick Wills Jr.
Buffalo Bills
10

Jedrick Wills Jr.

Tackle

Alabama, junior

  • GMS 13
  • STRTS 13
  • Sk ALL 1
Height/Weight6'5'', 322
Age20
Shades OfLa’el Collins

Tough, physical right tackle with easy athleticism and bulldozer power

Main Selling Point: Glass-eater mentality
Scouting Report

Wills is an industrial-strength, physical mauler at right tackle who brings a tenacious demeanor to both the run and pass games. The former five-star recruit wastes few movements, calmly stunning opposing pass rushers with a strong punch or manhandling opponents with his superior upper-body torque. He stays balanced and never panics as a pass protector. And in the run game, he hits like a freight train on down blocks―at times sending his targets flailing―and finds and engages blocks well at the second level. Wills earned an elite run-blocking grade from Pro Football Focus; per the Alabama team website, he gave up just one sack and 3.5 quarterback hurries on 714 snaps in 2019. 

Wills played exclusively at right tackle in college. He certainly has the traits to play on the left side in the pros, but he’s also not experienced at that spot.

Why He Could Rise

Wills combines power, athleticism, and a nasty temperament; he should start from day one in the pros.

Why He Could Fall

He may lack the overall foot quickness to play on the blind side.

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Cincinnati Bengals
Cincinnati Bengals
Andrew Thomas
Buffalo Bills
11

Andrew Thomas

Tackle

Georgia, junior

  • GMS 13
  • STRTS 13
  • Sk ALL 1
Height/Weight6'5'', 318
Age20
Shades OfRussell Okung

Combines incredible size, strength, and flexibility as a blindside protector with road-grading power to open up lanes in the run game

Main Selling Point: Length and power
Scouting Report

Thomas boasts a massive, well-proportioned frame with very long arms. The Georgia team captain and Outland Trophy semifinalist plays with a balanced base, consistently keeping his knees bent and feet moving in pass protection, and has a smooth kickstep to gain depth at the snap. Thanks to his length and quickness, it takes edge rushers forever to run around him. Thomas brings versatility and experience on both sides of the line; he started 15 games at right tackle as a true freshman, then made the move to the left side, where he started 26 games in the past two seasons combined. He’s been incredibly consistent at both spots, allowing just 37 pressures in three years per PFF, with just nine pressures surrendered in 2019. He mirrors well, times his punch, and plays with heavy hands―but he can improve at sustaining his blocks. 

In the ground game, Thomas is a bulldozer. He creates movement at the point of attack, his quick footwork helps him reach and seal defenders on outside runs, and he engulfs defenders on second-level blocks. Thomas is prone to lunging as a run blocker, though, at times getting out over his skis and ending up on the ground.

Why He Could Rise

Thomas has a rare blend of size, athleticism, consistency, and versatility; he is a plug-and-play starter on either side of the line.

Why He Could Fall

He lacks balance at times and can fall off blocks when he relies too much on his upper body strength.

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Green Bay Packers
Green Bay Packers
A.J. Epenesa
Buffalo Bills
12

A.J. Epenesa

Edge Rusher

Iowa, junior

  • TKLS 49
  • TFL 14.5
  • Sacks 11.5
Height/Weight6'6'', 284
Age21
Shades OfArik Armstead

Power-based defensive lineman with heavy hands and an NFL-ready frame; immovable on the edge and has the size and strength to rush inside on passing downs

Main Selling Point: Uncommon strength
Scouting Report

Epenesa is a big, rugged defensive end prospect with a muscular frame, long arms, and shockingly heavy hands. The former three-sport athlete―who also starred in high school in basketball and set an Illinois record in discus―plays like the football equivalent of a power forward, throwing his weight around while bringing an intimidating presence to the trenches as both a rusher and a run defender. He uses his arms like clubs to swipe away blocks and has a devastating long-arm stab, which he uses to just about lift offensive tackles off their feet as he walks them backward into the pocket. 

The Iowa star racked up 11.5 sacks in 2019 after posting 10.5 the year prior. He also notched 30.5 tackles for a loss, six passes defensed, and eight forced fumbles over the past two seasons. Epenesa has a good first step, but lacks speed and his rush can sometimes stall out at the top. If he tries for the edge and doesn’t get there, he can end up being stalemated out of a play.

Why He Could Rise

Epenesa controls opponents with overwhelming force; he brings the versatility to be a plug-and-play contributor on the edge or the inside and can play on all three downs.

Why He Could Fall

He has size but isn’t super explosive as a rusher. He’ll need to further develop his complement of power-based moves.

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Miami Dolphins
Miami Dolphins
K’Lavon Chaisson
Buffalo Bills
13

K'Lavon Chaisson

Edge Rusher

LSU, junior

  • TKLS 60
  • TFL 13.5
  • Sacks 6.5
Height/Weight6'4'', 249
Age20
Shades OfDanielle Hunter, Josh Allen

Bendy edge rusher with an explosive first step and the flexibility to turn the corner. Still raw and may need to get stronger in the pros.

Main Selling Point: Quick-twitch get-off, agility
Scouting Report

Chaisson has a chiseled frame with an explosion-generating lower half and long, muscled arms. The LSU team captain missed most of the 2018 season with a torn ACL but notched 6.5 sacks, 13.5 TFL, two pass deflections, and a forced fumble in 2019, relying on his superlative athleticism to make life hell for opposing tackles. Chaisson brings schematic versatility, with the ability to play either standing up or with his hand in the dirt, but is relatively raw as a pass rusher, having played the position just two seasons in high school and two seasons in college. He has a lightning-quick first step, Gumby-like flexibility, and a nonstop motor, but there are times when his pass rush plan lacks nuance and he relies on his speed to run past tackles, knife back inside, or try to bull-rush straight into the pocket. With more refinement of his burgeoning club, swim, and long-arm moves, he has the tools to become a dominant NFL pass rusher.

Chaisson is at his best going forward, but he has experience dropping back into coverage and tackling in space. He showcased his electric speed when he chased down Oklahoma wideout CeeDee Lamb in the Peach Bowl (he was the MVP of that game). He sets a strong edge in the run game and can burst through the line to blow plays up in the backfield.

Why He Could Rise

Chaisson has explosiveness and flexibility that you can’t teach; he’s still just scratching the surface of his potential and ended the season on an absolute tear.

Why He Could Fall

He may need time to bulk up at the next level and continue to develop his pass-rush plan. His athleticism didn’t translate to major production, and his career total of just 9.5 sacks could raise some questions.

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Atlanta Falcons
Atlanta Falcons
Jerry Jeudy
Buffalo Bills
14

Jerry Jeudy

Wide Receiver

Alabama, junior

  • YDS 1163
  • YPR 15.1
  • TDS 10
  • REC 77
  • 20+ 21
Height/Weight6'1'', 195
Age20
Shades OfCalvin Ridley, Robert Woods

Precision route-runner with extraordinary foot speed to pick up yards after the catch

Main Selling Point: Human-joystick jukes, rare quickness
Scouting Report

Jeudy is a big-play creator with a long, slim frame and exceptional suddenness in all his movements. The Crimson Tide star is a crisp route runner who uses RC-car acceleration off the line to eat up cushion or force defenders to open their hips, creating early separation. The 6-foot-1, 195-pound playmaker is tough to corral after the catch, capable of changing direction on a dime and exploding past would-be tacklers with signature dead-leg-style cuts and rocker-step moves that leave defenders grasping at clouds of dust. 

Jeudy had a few too many drops at Alabama, but also showed the ability to make the tough grabs, going up high to pluck the ball from the air or bending to effortlessly scoop a low pass. The 20-year-old phenom (he’ll turn 21 in late April) followed up his Biletnikoff award-winning 68-catch, 1,315-yard, 14-touchdown performance in 2018 with 77 catches for 1,163 yards and 10 scores last season. He can line up all over the formation and is a threat both deep down the field and underneath.

Why He Could Rise

Jeudy is an electric, quick-twitch athlete who can separate as a route runner and make defenders miss after the catch.

Why He Could Fall

He had some drops in 2019. He also has a thin, wiry frame and could struggle against physical corners on the outside after playing primarily in the slot at Alabama.

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Washington Redskins
Washington Redskins
Grant Delpit
Buffalo Bills
15

Grant Delpit

Safety

LSU, junior

  • TKLS 65
  • INTS 2
  • PBU 7
Height/Weight6'2'', 206
Age21
Shades OfMinkah Fitzpatrick

Versatile safety who lines up all over the secondary and always seems to know where the football is going; tackling became a major issue in 2019

Main Selling Point: Range and ball-hawking talent
Scouting Report

Delpit is a quick-twitch defensive back with a wiry frame and top-tier length. The Jim Thorpe Award winner (given to the nation’s best defensive back) and second-team AP All-American moves all over the formation, playing deep, over the slot, and in the box. He delivers big hits in run support and is an explosive blitzer who shoots gaps and makes plays in the backfield. It’s Delpit’s play-recognition skills, though, that separate him from the field: He reads route combinations and quarterbacks’ eyes, jumping routes or putting himself in a position to make a play. In coverage, he can flip his hips and run with pass catchers, turn and find the ball like cornerback, and break up or intercept the pass. He has excellent range and ball skills, and has netted seven picks, 16 passes defensed, seven sacks, and 139 tackles in the past two seasons. 

Tackling became a big red flag for the junior playmaker this season, though, with Delpit missing at least one tackle in all but one game. He’ll have to clean up that issue and avoid relying too much on shoulder shivers when trying to get off blocks; he’s too easily sealed out of the play at times.

Why He Could Rise

Delpit displayed rare coverage instincts, and has the athleticism to be a factor against the run and as a blizter.

Why He Could Fall

He missed far too many tackles last season.

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Carolina Panthers
Carolina Panthers
Mekhi Becton
Buffalo Bills
16

Mekhi Becton

Tackle

Louisville, junior

  • GMS 11
  • STRTS 11
  • Sk ALL 0
Height/Weight6'7'', 365
Age20
Shades OfBryant McKinnie

Massive yet nimble left tackle who plays with a mean streak in the run game and takes an hour to run around in pass protection

Main Selling Point: Absolute-unit size
Scouting Report

You know that famous picture of Derrick Henry standing next to Mark Ingram? That’s what Becton looks like next to … uh, basically every other offensive and defensive lineman. He’s a former high school basketball star who brings his hardwood skills to the gridiron, displaying quick feet and plenty of bend to mirror in pass protection. He dispatches edge rushers with prejudice, throwing them out of the proverbial club and jumping on top of them for good measure. When he gets his hands on an opponent, he uses his massive 7-foot wingspan to completely engulf them. And he plays with a nasty streak that every offensive line coach will love. 

Becton relies too much on his size and power at times, and will need to refine his techniques in pass protection at the next level. Still, he has physical attributes that you simply can’t teach.

Why He Could Rise

Becton brings elite upside because of his rare combination of size and athleticism.

Why He Could Fall

He’s still raw, and there could be concerns about his ability to stay at his ideal playing weight given his weight fluctuations in college.

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New York Giants
New York Giants
Tee Higgins
Buffalo Bills
17

Tee Higgins

Wide Receiver

Clemson, junior

  • YDS 1167
  • YPR 19.8
  • TDS 13
  • REC 59
  • 20+ 22
Height/Weight6'4'', 205
Age20
Shades OfDeVante Parker, Kenny Golladay

Fluid big-play threat who separates late and catches everything in his area code

Main Selling Point: Catch radius, smooth athleticism
Scouting Report

Higgins is a big, confident wideout with a massive catch radius and exceptional focus on contested passes. The 6-foot-4, 205-pound junior caught 59 passes for 1,167 yards and 13 touchdowns in 2019, eclipsing his 936-yard, 12-touchdown line from the season prior. He’s a dangerous deep threat who averaged 19.8 yards per reception last season―good for 13th among FBS players―and uses his long arms, strong hands, and top-tier body control to reach out over defenders and pluck passes out of the air. Higgins isn’t super sudden and doesn’t possess elite speed, but he has quick feet to beat press coverage and wins with his ability to separate late in his routes; he understands leverage and how to keep defenders on his hip until the ball arrives. He has dependable hands, with just six drops on 120 catchable passes in the past two seasons, per PFF.

Why He Could Rise

Higgins has the ability to take the top off a defense and win at the catch point; he’s got the skill-set to develop into a quarterback’s best friend on third downs and in the red zone.

Why He Could Fall

He lacks top-tier speed and could struggle to separate early in his routes.

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Minnesota Vikings
Minnesota Vikings
Justin Herbert
Buffalo Bills
18

Justin Herbert

Quarterback

Oregon, senior

  • YDS 3471
  • YPA 8.1
  • TDS 32
  • INTS 6
  • RTG 156.8
Height/Weight6'6'', 240
Age21
Shades OfRyan Tannehill, Carson Wentz

Tall, strong-armed pocket passer with the tools to develop into a quality starter; needs to improve consistency and decision-making to tap into his potential

Main Selling Point: Big arm, prototypical size
Scouting Report

Herbert is a big-bodied quarterback with a strong arm and playmaking athleticism. The four-year starter has shown remarkable adaptability helming three different schemes under three separate staffs in his career at Oregon (Mark Helfrich’s spread offense, Willie Taggart’s Gulf Coast offense, and Mario Cristobal’s pistol offense), and leaned on his football IQ and natural talent for throwing the ball. The senior passer’s three-sport background shows up on the field: He’s a former high school pitcher (who had a 94 mph fastball, one scout told Sports Illustrated) and basketball player who can power a deep pass through the wind and rain or create with his legs when things break down. Herbert didn’t make the massive jump this season many expected or hoped for, but he did improve from 2018 in every major statistical category, throwing for 3,471 yards, 32 touchdowns, and six interceptions at 8.1 yards per attempt while leading the Ducks to a Rose Bowl win. 

Herbert is comfortable stepping up into the pocket when he senses pressure and keeping his eyes downfield to read the defense. He has an effective head/shoulder fake to freeze defenders and throw to double-move routes; he throws a pretty seam ball, can uncork passes on the move, and has shown flashes of brilliance in the face of pressure. But while the Ducks signal-caller has made plenty of scintillating plays in his college career, consistency is an issue—both in his decision-making and accuracy. He’ll throw a perfectly placed laser downfield then miss a wide-open receiver on the next play. Herbert’s aggressiveness as a passer also seems to wax and wane from game to game. Herbert has suffered a few major injuries, including a broken femur in 2014 and broken collarbone on his non-throwing shoulder in 2017.

Why He Could Rise

Herbert is a smart, adaptable signal-caller with the skill set to develop into a starter a team can build around.

Why He Could Fall

He needs to develop more consistency as a passer and decision-maker; teams may be concerned that he failed to take his game to a new level in 2019.

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Tennessee Titans
Tennessee Titans
Henry Ruggs III
Buffalo Bills
19

Henry Ruggs III

Wide Receiver

Alabama, junior

  • YDS 746
  • YPR 18.7
  • TDS 7
  • REC 40
  • 20+ 15
Height/Weight5'11'', 192
Age20
Shades OfMini Martavis Bryant, T.Y. Hilton

Dangerous touchdown machine with elite speed and the ability to create after the catch; still developing intricacies of route-running

Main Selling Point: Field-tilting speed
Scouting Report

Ruggs is an explosive pass catcher with track speed (he broke the Alabama high school state record for the 100-meter dash with a 10.58-second time in 2017) and natural instincts for eluding defenders after the catch. If he gets some green, he’ll take advantage of it; the Crimson Tide standout has excellent acceleration and uses long strides to weave through defenses, annihilate pursuit angles, and pull away from the crowd. The dynamic playmaker followed up a 46-catch, 741-yard, 11-touchdown performance in 2018 with 40 catches for 746 yards and seven touchdowns this season, adding one rushing score to again prove that he’s a high-level touchdown-maker. Ruggs finished at Alabama with 24 of his 98 career receptions ending up in the end zone.

Because of that home-run potential, defensive backs and deep defenders always need to know where Ruggs is lined up―but he’s more than just a straight-line deep threat. The 5-foot-11, 192-pound pass catcher takes advantage of typical cornerback cushions on hitch and stop routes and is a back-shoulder master near the sideline. He’s also a major pain in the ass on crossing routes, where defenders struggle to match his easy speed across the field. While he was durable at Alabama, playing in 40 games, he has a slender, wiry frame that could make him susceptible to big hits at the next level. And he’s consistently a beat late getting out of his stance, with a hitch that slows him up before he can get into his route.

Why He Could Rise

Ruggs possesses the type of breakaway speed and run-after-the-catch elusiveness that every offense needs; he’s a touchdown-maker.

Why He Could Fall

He’s raw as a route runner, and never saw a large amount of volume in Alabama’s passing offense.

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Pittsburgh Steelers
Pittsburgh Steelers
Jalen Reagor
Buffalo Bills
20

Jalen Reagor

Wide Receiver

TCU, junior

  • YDS 611
  • YPR 14.2
  • TDS 5
  • REC 43
  • 20+ 9
Height/Weight5'10'', 196
Age21
Shades OfStefon Diggs, Percy Harvin

Electric pass catcher with turbo acceleration and surprising high-point skills whose production dropped in 2019

Main Selling Point: Rocket-booster speed
Scouting Report

Reagor is a muscled-up pass catcher with a compact frame that’s built for the NFL. His track background is apparent on tape―he’s a smooth athlete with incredible explosiveness in the short area and the top-end speed to take the top off a defense. The junior pass catcher made Bruce Feldman's preseason “Freaks List” thanks to his incredible weight-room prowess, including a 620-pound squat, a 380-pound bench, and a 380-pound clean. For context, Saquon Barkley and his tree-trunk quads squat 650 pounds

The Horned Frogs star has some drops on his tape, but at 5-foot-10 and 196 pounds, he’s surprisingly adept at going up and making tough catches away from his body in traffic, displaying good high-point timing and concentration to reel balls in. Reagor is a shifty return man with jitterbug quicks that help him find daylight, and averaged 20.8 yards per return on punts in 2019. His receiving numbers were anything but jaw-dropping in 2019 thanks in part to subpar quarterback play, and his 43 catches for 611 yards and five touchdowns represented a disappointing dropoff from the season prior, when he posted a 72-catch, 1,061-yard, nine-touchdown line while adding 170 yards and two scores on the ground. But context for Reagor’s statistical setback is important: As a team, TCU’s offense netted just 2,444 passing yards and 15 total passing touchdowns in 2019―giving Reagor a 25-percent yardage share and 33-percent touchdown share of that unit.

Why He Could Rise

Reagor is an explosive playmaker who’s dangerous on sweeps, screens, and handoffs—and he has the speed to take the top off a defense on the outside.

Why He Could Fall

His drops could be a concern, and he will need to expand and refine his route tree at the next level.

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Seattle Seahawks
Seattle Seahawks
J.K. Dobbins
Buffalo Bills
21

J.K. Dobbins

Running Back

Ohio State, junior

  • YDS 2003
  • YPC 6.7
  • TDS 21
  • REC 23
  • 20+ 24
Height/Weight5'9'', 219
Age21
Shades OfDoug Martin

Versatile back with good size, excellent vision, top-tier acceleration, and sought-after pass-catching chops

Main Selling Point: Three-down skill set
Scouting Report

Dobbins has a compact, muscle-hamstery frame and plays with a low center of gravity. He knows how to absorb contact and stay upright, is crafty at picking the right running lanes, and uses his Ferrari-like burst to explode through small openings and into the open field. He enjoyed his best season for the Buckeyes in 2019, rushing for 2,003 yards with 21 touchdowns (both tied for third nationally) while finishing tied for second in both 20-plus-yard (20) and 50-plus-yard runs (6). He was an explosive play- and touchdown-creator at the highest level, and did his best work in big games: He closed his college career by rushing for 157 yards against Penn State, 211 against Michigan, 172 against Wisconsin, and 174 against Clemson.  

Dobbins is also a reliable, natural pass catcher―he caught 71 passes for 645 yards with five scores in three seasons at Ohio State―giving him every-down potential in the NFL. He’ll have to clean up his pass protection to accomplish that, because while he can lay licks on oncoming blitzers, he’s missed a few assignments in that area, as well.

Why He Could Rise

Dobbins has the athleticism, elusiveness, and passing-game skill set to become an impact NFL starter from day one.

Why He Could Fall

He isn’t a big, bruising type who will regularly push a pile, and lapses in pass protection could limit his third-down utility.

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Baltimore Ravens
Baltimore Ravens
Trevon Diggs
Buffalo Bills
22

Trevon Diggs

Cornerback

Alabama, senior

  • TKLS 37
  • INTS 3
  • PBU 8
Height/Weight6'2'', 202
Age22
Shades OfXavien Howard

Well-built and stingy cover corner with a prototypical blend of size, speed, and physicality

Main Selling Point: Size and athleticism
Scouting Report

Diggs has a solid, muscled frame and top-tier athleticism. The former receiver and younger brother of Stefon Diggs played in all three phases for the Crimson Tide as a true freshman in 2016 before making the switch to corner as a sophomore, showing he’s capable of muscling up bigger pass catchers over the past three seasons. Diggs shows excellent awareness in zone, reads route combos, and jumps into passing lanes (as he did on a pick-six vs. Arkansas), and gave up just 13 receptions all season, according to PFF, notching eight passes defensed, three picks, and a pair of fumble recoveries. 

As should be expected from someone who made a position change in college, Diggs is relatively raw at the position. He is best when using his size and physicality at the line of scrimmage and has receiver-like ball skills, but is inconsistent looking back for the ball in coverage. He isn’t as physical as he could be against the run. He missed nine games in 2018 with a broken foot.

Why He Could Rise

Diggs has the frame and athletic talent to develop into a shutdown corner in the NFL.

Why He Could Fall

He’s still perfecting his technique, can improve as a run defender, and may fit best on teams that employ press-man and Cover-3 looks.

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Houston Texans
Houston Texans
Jonathan Taylor
Buffalo Bills
23

Jonathan Taylor

Running Back

Wisconsin, junior

  • YDS 2003
  • YPC 6.3
  • TDS 21
  • REC 26
  • 20+ 16
Height/Weight5'10'', 218
Age20
Shades OfNick Chubb

Explosive back with tackle-breaking power, quick feet, and home run speed―but questions about his role in the passing game

Main Selling Point: Elusiveness, breakaway speed
Scouting Report

Taylor is a big, well-proportioned back with massive legs and a broad upper half. The two-time first-team All-American is a tough inside runner with good vision and a knack for finding and exploiting gaps in the defense; he uses quick, staccato chop steps in traffic to keep defenders from squaring him up; and it often looks like he’s skiing moguls when he’s running downhill. Taylor has good balance through contact, keeps his feet firing in a scrum, and frequently falls forward for an extra yard or two after being corralled. 

In the open field, the Wisconsin back is a star and has speed to burn—he’s a two-time high school state champion in the 100 meters—and if the defense gives him an inch, he’ll take a mile. Taylor was incredibly productive for the Badgers, racking up 6,174 rushing yards in his career (the most for any player in a three-year span in college football history) while finding pay dirt 50 times. He’s a solid pass protector who understands assignments and can wall off blitzers. And he’s durable: He never missed a game in college.

Taylor’s utility in the passing game is questionable: He improved drastically in that area in 2019, catching 26 passes for 252 yards and five touchdowns, but registered just 16 receptions combined the prior two seasons at Wisconsin. He’ll have to expand his route tree and catch consistency at the next level to earn passing-down duties. Taylor fumbled 18 times in his three-year career at Wisconsin, losing 15 of them.

Why He Could Rise

Taylor has an uncommon blend of size, speed, and electric footwork; he’s a day one starter with Pro Bowl potential.

Why He Could Fall

With 926 carries in his college career, teams may question the amount of mileage on his tires. Fumbles are a real concern.

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Oakland Raiders
Oakland Raiders
D'Andre Swift
Buffalo Bills
24

D'Andre Swift

Running Back

Georgia, junior

  • YDS 1218
  • YPC 6.2
  • TDS 7
  • REC 24
  • 20+ 15
Height/Weight5'9'', 215
Age21
Shades OfDalvin Cook, Duke Johnson

Creative, instinctive runner who’s slippery between the tackles, elusive in the open field, and dynamic in the passing game―but may not be a workhorse back in the NFL

Main Selling Point: Versatility, vision
Scouting Report

Swift has a compact, muscled-up frame with smooth athleticism, excellent balance, and lightning-quick suddenness in his cuts. He’s not a big-time bruiser, but he can make hay between the tackles with quick footwork and the ability to slither through creases. He runs downhill when he needs to—he’s not afraid to mix it up in the briar patch—but has the speed and vision to bounce it to the outside when space opens up. He uses choppy steps, effective head and shoulder fakes, and good hesitation and spin moves to juke defenders and create yards at the second level. Swift is a very good pass catcher and capable of running routes from all over the formation. He’s a natural hands catcher and playmaking talent after the catch. 

Swift rushed for 2,267 yards and 17 touchdowns in the past two seasons at Georgia, adding 56 catches for 513 yards and four scores through the air, but his ability to carry a heavy load in the NFL could be a concern. He never carried the ball more than 25 times in a game in college, eclipsing 20 carries just three times.

Why He Could Rise

Swift is a dynamic playmaker with the skill set to play on all three downs, and he should contribute early in the ground game and passing attack.

Why He Could Fall

He’s never carried a heavy workload and some teams may view him as a committee back.

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Philadelphia Eagles
Philadelphia Eagles
Neville Gallimore
Buffalo Bills
25

Neville Gallimore

Interior Defensive Lineman

Oklahoma, redshirt senior

  • TKLS 30
  • TFL 7.5
  • Sacks 4
Height/Weight6'2'', 302
Age22
Shades OfGeno Atkins

Powerful interior defensive lineman with a turbo-charged get-off, top-tier athleticism, and a handful of go-to moves in creating havoc in the pocket

Main Selling Point: Explosiveness and agility
Scouting Report

Gallimore is a stout, powerful defensive lineman with long arms, tree trunks for legs, and the ability to line up at multiple spots on the interior. He plays with a low center of gravity and an energetic style that’s not only contagious for the whole defense, but makes me want to go run through a wall. The Canada native is an absurdly strong big man who reportedly bench presses 500 pounds, squats 800 pounds, and power cleans 405 pounds. He has incredible explosiveness as well as people-moving strength, and uncoils out of his stance to shoot gaps and power through the line. He’s developed effective rip, swim, and spin moves that regularly leave offensive linemen lunging for clouds of dust, and always keeps his feet and hands churning. Gallimore looks like he’s playing at a different speed than anyone in the trenches; he’s capable of chasing runs down the line and moves in space with ease. 

However, Gallimore’s production didn’t always match his eye-popping athleticism—he notched 12.5 tackles for loss, seven sacks, and four forced fumbles in the past two seasons combined. He’ll need to prove he can turn his explosiveness into impact plays at the next level. He’s on the short side to play anywhere but on the nose or at the three-technique spot.

Why He Could Rise

Gallimore is an extraordinary athlete with the explosiveness, motor, and repertoire of moves to become a game-wrecker from the inside.

Why He Could Fall

His production was disappointing and his lack of length could limit where’s deployed.

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Indianapolis Colts
Indianapolis Colts
Kristian Fulton
Buffalo Bills
26

Kristian Fulton

Cornerback

LSU, senior

  • TKLS 38
  • INTS 1
  • PBU 14
Height/Weight6'0'', 194
Age21
Shades OfA.J. Bouye, Chidobe Awuzie

Well-built cornerback with excellent instincts, a knack for consistently tight coverage, and good ball skills

Main Selling Point: Sticky coverage talent
Scouting Report

Fulton has a muscular frame, good athleticism, and plenty of length. The former five-star recruit plays with excellent balance and wastes no movements when backpedaling or flipping his hips in coverage. He rarely gives up much separation in man coverage looks―sticking close to opponents with a combination of quickness and route anticipation—and has the speed to hang with receivers all the way down the field. In zone looks, he shows good instincts, reading the quarterback’s eyes to jump routes and put himself in a position to make a play. Fulton broke up 14 passes (tied for eighth among all defenders) and notched one pick and 31 tackles in 13 games in 2019. While Fulton can play with physicality in press, his tackling often lacks oomph. He missed the 2017 season to suspension after tampering with an NCAA drug test.

Why He Could Rise

Fulton has an ideal blend of size and speed and is incredibly sticky in coverage.

Why He Could Fall

He is not a tough, physical tackler and it may be a red flag for some teams that he struggled in coverage against Clemson in the national championship game.

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Oakland Raiders
Oakland Raiders
CJ Henderson
Buffalo Bills
27

CJ Henderson

Cornerback

Florida, junior

  • TKLS 33
  • INTS 0
  • PBU 11
Height/Weight6'1'', 196
Age21
Shades OfMarcus Peters

Springy, long-limbed corner with electric footwork, great speed, and natural ball-hawking talent

Main Selling Point: Length and ball skills
Scouting Report

Henderson is a highly athletic cornerback with a lean, angular frame and long arms. The Florida star plays with a balanced base and uses an effective jam in press coverage but seems most comfortable playing off coverage with his eyes on the quarterback, where he can monitor the action, decipher route combinations, and break on passes. He uses quick footwork to mirror his receiver, consistently staying in lockstep with his opponent, and is a deft blitzer, exploding past would-be blockers to get to the quarterback. Henderson uses his length well in coverage: While he wasn’t targeted frequently, he showed some intriguing ball skills, undercutting receivers to reach around or past them to bat the ball down or rake it out of their hands before they can complete the catch. 

Henderson went pick-less in 2019 but notched six interceptions in his Florida career, to go with 20 passes defensed. His physicality at the catch point can be a double-edged sword, though, and his tendency to get grabby could get him in trouble at the next level. And while he has incredible weight room strength (the junior defensive back reportedly benches 380 pounds and squats 545 pounds), he may need to be more consistently physical against the run at the next level.

Why He Could Rise

Henderson has top-tier speed, playmaking instincts, and the competitive swagger to start early in his career.

Why He Could Fall

His production dropped in 2019 and he showed inconsistency as a tackler.

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Los Angeles Chargers
Los Angeles Chargers
Xavier McKinney
Buffalo Bills
28

Xavier McKinney

Safety

Alabama, junior

  • TKLS 95
  • INTS 3
  • PBU 5
Height/Weight6'1'', 204
Age20
Shades OfMalcolm Jenkins

Rangy playmaker with the ability to line up deep, in the box, or over the slot; brings reliability as a tackler and flexibility in coverage

Main Selling Point: Versatility and ball skills
Scouting Report

McKinney has a long, slender frame and the versatility to play in multiple spots on a defense. He has experience playing deep in two- or one-high looks, over the slot, and on the edge as a blitzer. A semifinalist for the Jim Thorpe Award (presented annually to the nation’s top defensive back), McKinney was asked to do it all in Alabama’s scheme: He ran from sideline to sideline, covered receivers out of the slot, and flew through gaps as a blitzer. He closes incredibly quickly on ball carriers and delivers some pop as a tackler. He’s shown good ball skills, ripping the ball away from pass catchers or reaching into passing lanes, and has strong instincts to recognize the play and react instantly. McKinney racked up a team-high 95 tackles in 2019—5.5 going for a loss—adding three sacks, three picks, five passes defensed, and four forced fumbles. He notched six tackles for a loss, two interceptions, 10 passes defensed, and two forced fumbles in 2018. Put more simply: He just makes plays.

Why He Could Rise

McKinney brings a deploy-him-all-over-the-field versatility and an aggressive demeanor as a tackler.

Why He Could Fall

He may lack the pure speed to play single-high safety at the next level, and a multiple robber-type role that asks him to fly downhill and play over the slot could be his best fit.

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Seattle Seahawks
Seattle Seahawks
Yetur Gross-Matos
Buffalo Bills
29

Yetur Gross-Matos

Edge Rusher

Penn State, junior

  • TKLS 40
  • TFL 15
  • Sacks 9.5
Height/Weight6'5'', 264
Age21
Shades OfMontez Sweat

Long-levered defensive end with the size and explosiveness to develop into an elite pass rusher

Main Selling Point: Length and athletic upside
Scouting Report

Gross-Matos is a tall, high-cut edge rusher with a nice get-off and the ability to set a strong edge. He’s an effective pass rusher and run defender who posted at least 8.0 sacks in each of the past two seasons and 33.5 tackles for loss in that 23-game stretch (including 20.0 in 2018). The Penn State standout has extremely long arms that give him a reach advantage against just about every opponent he faces; he knows how to keep offensive linemen at bay and boasts a massive tackling radius. He hits like a Mack truck when he gets a line on the quarterback and shows flashes of good bend to turn the corner or duck beneath a block. 

Gross-Matos should offer some positional and schematic versatility. He has the athleticism and length to play either side in a four-man front, bump inside to play the three-technique spot in nickel situations, or line up on the edge as an outside linebacker. But he may need to bulk up and refine his pass-rushing repertoire to excel in any scheme.

Why He Could Rise

Gross-Matos has top-tier upside thanks to a rare blend of length and explosiveness; he’s still just scratching the surface of his potential as an edge defender.

Why He Could Fall

He was named in a recently filed hazing lawsuit. The suit says Gross-Matos and others “facilitated a campaign to harass and haze the lowerclassmen.”

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Green Bay Packers
Green Bay Packers
Jeff Gladney
Buffalo Bills
30

Jeff Gladney

Cornerback

TCU, senior

  • TKLS 31
  • INTS 1
  • PBU 14
Height/Weight6'0'', 183
Age23
Shades OfDarius Slay

Twitchy playmaker with excellent quickness and ball skills in coverage and the ability to pack some punch as a run defender

Main Selling Point: Foot speed and swagger
Scouting Report

Gladney has a wiry frame and long arms but plays with strength that matches his weight-room prowess (he reportedly squats 620 pounds, benches 400 pounds, and power-cleans 400). The Horned Frogs playmaker has the combination of very quick feet and oily hips that make him effective in both press-man and off-coverage looks. He’s patient at the line and trusts his own speed, rarely opening his hips too early and allowing receivers to cross him up. He has twitchy movements while mirroring in coverage, and whether playing with inside or outside leverage he has outstanding instincts in anticipating opponents’ routes. He shows good awareness in zone; understands spacing and route combinations to drop into passing lanes, and has excellent flexibility in half-turn technique to strafe toward the middle of the field or toward the sideline without breaking speed or losing balance. The former high school receiver has natural ball skills―both in finding the ball to swat it away or playing his receiver’s hands at the catch point―and recorded three interceptions and 26 pass breakups in the past two seasons. He’s gotten reps lining up over the slot, too.

Why He Could Rise

Gladney has lightning feet, good speed, and instincts in coverage―plus he’s a strong run defender.

Why He Could Fall

He may need to add some bulk to better compete against some of the league’s bigger, more physical receivers.

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Los Angeles Rams
Los Angeles Rams
Jordan Love
Buffalo Bills
31

Jordan Love

Quarterback

Utah State, redshirt junior

  • YDS 3402
  • YPA 7.2
  • TDS 20
  • INTS 17
  • RTG 129.1
Height/Weight6'3'', 224
Age21
Shades OfYOLO Marcus Mariota

Dynamic signal-caller with a flick-of-the-wrist throwing style, good touch, and plenty of athleticism―but big questions around his decision-making and ball security

Main Selling Point: Tools, tools, tools
Scouting Report

Love is as big of a traits-based prospect as we’ll see in this draft. The 6-foot-3, 224-pound quarterback has prototypical size, athleticism, and a strong arm but took a massive step back statistically this year (partially due to a coaching change and a lack of surrounding talent). He tossed 20 touchdowns to 17 interceptions after posting a 32-to-6 touchdown-to-interception line the season prior. But his skill set and potential ceiling as a passer are sure to intrigue a few teams―and it’s notable that less-than-impressive final stat lines didn’t cause Josh Allen or Daniel Jones to fall too far in recent years. 

Love has showed off flashes of incredible touch and precise ball placement to every level of the field while operating primarily in a shotgun offense; he has the ability to manipulate defenders with his eyes; he has a pretty, catchable deep ball; and he shows willingness to attempt tight-window throws against one-on-one coverage. He throws well on the move, and when plays break down, he has the athleticism to pick up yards on the ground (he ran for 403 yards and scored nine touchdowns in three seasons at Utah State). Love can strafe, backpedal, and keep himself in a throwing posture while avoiding the rush in a muddied pocket, and he never seems fazed―even when the gates of hell apparently open up in the stands

That said, Love’s big plays are too often punctuated by poor ones. His ball placement is erratic at times, which is a trait that could get him in trouble. He has the ability to toggle through throws of varying velocity, but there were times when his default was to loft up a rainbow when a bullet throw was necessary. Overall, Love created far too many turnovers, and appeared to predetermine his targets while ignoring coverages.

Why He Could Rise

Love has scintillating arm talent and a high ceiling as a passer; his skill set should translate well to the combine and pro day environments.

Why He Could Fall

He comes with a low floor, he turned the ball over far, far too much in 2019, and he may need some time as a backup to refine his game.

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New England Patriots
New England Patriots
Kenneth Murray
Buffalo Bills
32

Kenneth Murray

Linebacker

Oklahoma, junior

  • TKLS 102
  • TFL 17
  • Sacks 4
Height/Weight6'2'', 243
Age21
Shades OfDeion Jones

Rangy and ferocious off-ball linebacker who fits the modern game; he tackles, blitzes, and has the athleticism to cover―but needs more discipline

Main Selling Point: Sideline-to-sideline speed
Scouting Report

Murray has a chiseled frame with long arms and a solid lower half. The Sooners defensive captain has racked up 325 tackles—36.5 of them for a loss—to go with 9.5 sacks in three seasons, using turbo-boosted acceleration to close on ball-carriers in interior gaps or range from sideline to sideline on outside runs. The junior linebacker is excellent as a blitzer, flying downhill like a bolt of lightning, and is smooth in his coverage drops. Murray doesn’t have a ton of experience in man-coverage looks, but has the speed and size to carry running backs and tight ends downfield. 

Murray plays with his hair on fire, which has led him to misdiagnose plays or miss his gap at times, or overpursue at others. He cleaned up his tackling in 2019 after missing 20 tackles in 2018, but still has a tendency to come in and meet opponents too high, something he’ll have to improve at the next level.

Why He Could Rise

Murray is a three-down linebacker with the range and twitchy athleticism to make plays all over the field.

Why He Could Fall

He’s inconsistent in play-recognition and instincts, and he’ll have to prove he can cover man-to-man in the NFL.

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Measurement data and player statistics via cfbstats.com and school bios.